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Jon Talton

Analysis and commentary on economic news, trends and issues, with an emphasis on Seattle and the Northwest.

March 17, 2014 at 10:08 AM

In a global comparison, Seattle GDP tops Hong Kong

Ninety percent of American output comes from its metropolitan areas. A survey from the Martin Prosperity Institute looks at how the biggest metros would stack up against international competitors. Seattle’s $280 billion in gross metropolitan product is larger than Hong Kong’s or Chile’s.

This map shows comparisons for the largest metros. New York’s output is almost as large as Australia, which is the world’s 12th largest economy. Los Angeles, at $830 billion, bests the Netherlands and standing alone would be among the top 20 economies on the planet.

With such economic importance, it’s notable that major metros so often lose out in state legislatures. Olympia, for example, did nothing to aid infrastructure or transit in metro Seattle this session, and has a long way to go to undo the damage done to the University of Washington funding that was slashed in the recession.

We’re not alone. Political scientists at the University of Rochester found that nationally bills introduced by lawmakers representing cities of 100,000 or larger had a harder time becoming law. Other research has tried to make sense of the disconnect.

But the fact remains that too many state lawmakers are hostile or indifferent to feeding the golden goose upon which all districts, especially net-taker rural ones, depend.

And Don’t Miss: Millennial MBAs are selfish, hard to please and in a hurry | BusinessWeek

Today’s Econ Haiku:

Vlad impales Ukraine

Wall Street looks the other way

Crimea river

Comments | More in

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