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May 17, 2008 at 10:00 PM

Erik Bedard: Frugal with his answers

“He was dealing tonight,” manager John McLaren said of his starter Erik Bedard. No argument there. He struck out a season-high 10, had two different stretches in which he retired seven in a row and didn’t allow a hit in the final four innings he pitched.
How’d he do it in the same week that he lasted only two innings on the mound in Texas? Well, if something changed, he wasn’t real forthcoming with that. Here’s the transcript of his interview. As you can see by the length, it didn’t take a whole lot of time to compile:
[Author’s note: These were not compiled with any sort of passive-aggressive swipe at Bedard. This was the first time this specific reporter was ever involved in an interview with Bedard. It’s his prerogative how to answer questions. I thought people would be interested in his answers and that’s the only reason I posted them. — Danny O’Neil.]
Q: What was your approach to the game tonight? The Padres were complimenting you before the game on your aggressiveness.
Bedard: Just trying to throw strikes.
Q: Ten [strikeouts] tonight.
Bedard: Yeah. It doesn’t matter. As long as we get the win at the end of the game, that’s all that matters.
Q: Double digits, though, you have to feel a little bit good about that. Give yourself a little credit.
Bedard: Not really.
Q: You had trouble getting into a rhythm in Texas. Were you able to get into that rhythm tonight?
Bedard: Just trying to throw strikes and get ahead and get ‘em off balance.
Q: More movement on your fastball this game?
Bedard: The same. Same as usual.
Q: Any pitch that was more effective tonight?
Bedard: (Shakes his head).
— End of transcript —
Not real compelling stuff there. In absence of insight from the man himself, we’ll turn to the player who caught his pitches on Saturday night, catcher Jamie Burke:
“His ball was cutting a little bit more tonight,” Burke said. “He just had some good movement on his fastball today and that was a key for him and obviously being able to throw the curveball for strikes and then getting it down when he needed to.”
OK. That helps us understand just how Bedard was so effective.

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