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May 17, 2013 at 2:07 PM

Danny Farquhar up from Class AAA to join Mariners bullpen

This Lego portrait of Mariners ace Felix Hernandez, hanging in the visiting clubhouse, was done using 8,000 tiny blocks over a span of 50 hours. It's the product of Wayne Petz, an assistant clubhouse attendant on the visitors' side at Progressive Field.

This Lego portrait of Mariners ace Felix Hernandez, hanging in the visiting clubhouse, was done using 8,000 tiny blocks over a span of 50 hours. It’s the product of Wayne Petz, an assistant clubhouse attendant on the visitors’ side at Progressive Field.

After Hector Noesi threw those 4 1/3 innings last night, it was clear the Mariners would need some extra bullpen help. So, they’re getting that tonight as Noesi has been optioned to Class AAA and Danny Farquhar has been called up.

To clear a roster spot for Farquhar, the Mariners placed Stephen Pryor on the 60-day DL. That move likely won’t delay Pryor’s return to the big leagues, since it can be backdated to when his injury occured just over a month ago.

Farquhar, 26, got himself noticed with a strong showing for the Mariners this spring and had been used in a closing role by AAA Tacoma. His outings have been better of late after he mixed in his curveball more to offset a 95 mph fastball and 91 mph cutter.

“The curveball definitely is a big offspeed pitch that I need to continue to throw for strikes, continue to mix in there,” Farquhar said. “Just because I have the cutter and the fastball — they’re two hard, hard pitches. Even just showing a hitter the curveball…it’s so much easier and more fun to pitch when you have extra weapons like that.”

Farquhar has had a taste of the big leagues before, getting into three games with Toronto in 2011 and allowing three runs on four hits over four innings.

He got the news last night after an extra-inning loss by Tacoma. He was “starving” and waiting in the clubhouse food line with his teammates when he got called into the manager’s office and was handed the news he’d be en route to Cleveland.

Farquhar promptly forgot all about the food and went to tell his wife the good news.

The velocity Farquhar can generate is impressive, given that he stands just 5-foot-9 and weighs only 180 pounds.

“It’s funny because growing up, I was actually a bigger kid,” he said. “And I think that’s why I don’t have any issues whenever somebody makes fun of me because I’m short. And I never have any problems, I don’t have Little Man’s Syndrome, because I was always a bigger kid. And then, when I was 12 I just stopped growing. I think I was about 5-foot-8 when I was 12 and I grew maybe another inch after that.

“So, I always had a good arm. I played outfield growing up. I played center field. And I always had a good arm from the outfield. Pitching really started becoming my craft at the end of my high school career. And that’s when my velocity started going up.”

Comments | More in roster | Topics: Danny Farquhar; Hector Noesi; Stephen Pryor; bullpen

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