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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

February 13, 2006 at 9:54 AM

X’ing out the shortages

Anyone should be able to walk into a store and buy an Xbox 360 game console within the next four to six weeks. At least that’s the prediction of Peter Moore, Microsoft’s Xbox chief, who spoke on Friday at the Dice Summit gaming convention in Henderson, Nev.

According to reports from the event, Moore hammered the industry for not taking more risks and producing original, innovative games.

“We’re getting more like TV and movies a little bit, in that we’re taking that formula,” Moore said, according to Gamasutra. “We’re bringing people sequels one and two and three and four.”

Industry leaders have been saying this for years, but no one can deny that sequels to big games bring in boatloads of money for developers and publishers.

There seems to be an assumption in the industry, voiced by Nintendo of America’s chief marketing officer Reggie Fils-Aime and others, that innovation and originality will diversify the user base. That is, new and different games will draw in new and different gamers.

Is this proving to be true? Certainly there have been some high-profile games recently that fall into this category, such as Guitar Hero, Katamari Damacy (and its sequel) and Nintendogs. They’ve all sold beyond expectations, but it’s unclear if they’re doing anything to expand the market.

This storyhas more about Fils-Aime’s thoughts on how disruptive technologies will appeal to non-traditional gamers.

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