Follow us:

Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

January 11, 2007 at 4:14 PM

CES: Are the creatives keeping up with technology?

LAS VEGAS — I reported today on representatives of the actors and directors guilds who were at CEStrying to learn about new technologies for delivering content and how their profession may be impacted.

Creative types have been showing up at mobile communications industry conferences, too, according to my colleague Tricia Duryee, who attends plenty of them.

A reader of today’s story was worried whether the entertainers and artists are doing enough to catch the anytime, anywhere content wave:

They seem passive in the face of a juggernaut of challenges to their copyright and moral rights, the foundation stones of their income stream. I remember when digital photography emerged as a new medium in the late’80s and photographers pounced on it like a cat on a mouse. The old timers wanted to kill it with insults and insinuations, while the youth embraced its potential. The youth were right, but they didn’t foresee the arrival of huge digital libraries that have turned photography into a commodity. This is going to happen to movies, just like it’s happened to music, with radical impact on incomes. In your article, actor Carlton traces the lineage of his royalties from Robocop. He may not know it, but those days are over. Movies are becoming commodities, too, and Robocop is one selection among hundreds of thousands. YouTube is the model, and the Screen Actors Guild membership is going to be hammered.

On that last point, the guild members I talked to are very aware of and concerned about YouTube.

“Essentially YouTube is built with the use of copyrighted, unlicensed content and many of those video presentations have Screen Actors Guild members in them,” said Brian Hamilton, a SAG board member who serves on the union’s new technologies committee. “How will they be compensated?”

He thinks he knows the answer, and it doesn’t sound all that good for his members: “I’m envisioning a lot of backroom compensation going on that will short-change the performer.”

Comments | More in Consumer Electronics Show

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►