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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

February 21, 2007 at 11:02 AM

Verizon Wireless revs engine

Verizon Wireless said this week that it will be rolling out an even faster wireless network in the Seattle, Bellevue, Tacoma, Spokane and Vancouver areas.

The network, called EV-DO Rev. A (or Evolution-Data Optimized Revision A), primarily increases upload speeds by five or six times over the original EV-DO network that was rolled out in Washington in 2005. The Rev A network also slightly increases download speeds.

Customers who subscribe to Verizon Wireless’s BroadbandAccess can expect average download speeds of 450-800 kilobits per second and average upload speeds of 300-400 kbps on a phone or through a laptop connection.

The speed is the equivalent of being able to download a 1 Megabyte e-mail attachment — a small PowerPoint presentation or a large PDF file — in less than 15 seconds and upload the same size file in less than 25 seconds.

For now, two wireless modem cards for laptops will be available to take advantage of the new speeds.

Earlier this month, I wrote that Verizon Wireless had announced its intentions for rolling out the faster speed network, also called 3.5G. It came on the heels of an announcement by Sprint Nextel, which had already rolled out service in Seattle and at least 21 other markets.

In the Seattle area, there are plenty of high-speed wireless options: AT&T, the former Cingular, Sprint Nextel and Verizon Wireless access. T-Mobile USA provides slightly slower speeds, and Clearwire provides wireless Internet access for computers.

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