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Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

May 8, 2007 at 8:01 AM

Vista adoption survey shows more groups testing

Fewer than a third of organizations surveyed in February were evaluating or using Windows Vista, according to a survey of IT decision makers. But that number has increased 8 percentage points since Microsoft launched the operating system in November.

IT consultants CDW conducted the survey, the second of three it’s planning to track attitudes and adoption plans for Windows Vista. The survey, conducted over seven days at the end of February, gathered opinions from 753 IT decision makers. The earlier survey was conducted in October.

Among the findings:

— 29 percent of respondents said their organizations are currently evaluating, testing or implementing Vista, up from 21 percent during the first survey.

— Of those currently using or evaluating the operating system, 19 percent don’t currently plan to upgrade. That’s an increase from 15 percent in the earlier survey. (The surveys have a margin of error of +/-3.5 percent at a 95 percent confidence level.)

— Of those implementing Vista currently, 12 percent called their experience thus far “very favorable,” down from 14 percent; 48 percent said “somewhat favorable,” down from 56 percent; 14 percent said “somewhat unfavorable,” up from 6 percent; and 4 percent said “very unfavorable,” up from 3 percent.

— IT decision makers’ expectations of benefits from deploying Vista saw significant declines from the earlier survey in three areas: In the previous survey, 63 percent were expecting improved performance; now 56 percent are. There were also declines in expectations for improved patch management and Windows Update.

— Meanwhile, their concerns increased significantly in two key areas: 38 percent said the benefits of upgrading to Vista were not clear enough, compared with 32 percent in the earlier survey. 37 percent said the hardware requirements to upgrade were too excessive, compared with 28 percent earlier. The IT decision makers were less concerned than before about not having enough money to pay for the upgrade (25 percent vs. 30 percent).

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