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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

August 10, 2007 at 8:25 AM

China, France, Poland top podium in Microsoft Olympics

With the 2008 Olympics in Beijing now less than a year away, we’re getting in the mood for medals. And we can consider Microsoft’s Imagine Cup, a global technology and creativity competition among students from around the world, the Olympics of software. So, with the winners of this year’s cup announced today, let’s do a “medal count” — admittedly an imprecise measure because of inconsistent factors from country to country such as population and resources — and see which countries have the top young technology talent.

The Imagine Cup has nine events from Algorithm to Short Film. Microsoft lists the top three finishers in each category. There’s also an interactive map of the world showing all finalists by category and country.

Both China and France had four teams finish in the top three, the most of any country, but each had only one first place. China’s was in the IT Challenge, which asks competitors to “demonstrate proficiency in the science of networks, databases, and servers, as well as the areas of analysis and decision making in IT environments.” The French team took first in Web development. (Taiwan also had a second-place finish.)

Poland had three winning teams, all of which finished first. The country dominated the visual arts, winning the photography and short film categories, as well as the algorithm category — perhaps the most demanding of the event. It’s an individual competition comprised of “brain teasers, coding challenges, and algorithmic puzzles.”

Romania and Brazil had two top-three finishers each.

In the high-profile software design category, in which teams of students used Microsoft technologies to design applications to improve education, Thailand took top honors, followed by Korea and Jamaica.

The complete results are available here.

The United States had several finalists, but no top-three finishers. Those so inclined to do so might read this as another piece of evidence that the U.S. is lagging the rest of the world in math and science education.

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