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September 18, 2007 at 12:59 PM

Gates Foundation executive is knighted

Dr. Tadataka “Tachi” Yamada, president of the global health program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, today can add knighthood to his list of achievements.

RICHARD BROWN/GATES FOUNDATION

Tachi Yamada joined the Gates Foundation in 2006.

Yamada received the honor for his work at pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, where he was head of research and development from 2000 to 2006. During that time he helped make GSK into an R&D powerhouse, the U.K.’s most innovative company and the commercial leader in researching diseases of the developing world, the U.K. government said in a press release. Yamada earned a B.A. in history from Stanford University, his M.D. from New York University School of Medicine.

The official title “honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE)” is given by the Queen. Foreign citizens are recognized for important contributions to relations between their country and Britain, but only U.K. citizens with knighthood get the title of Sir or Dame. Yamada is an American citizen.

“I am delighted and humbled to receive this great honor,” he said in a statement. “The U.K. is at the forefront of scientific innovation, particularly in discovering new medicines and improving global health. It has been my privilege to work with extraordinary British colleagues throughout my career in academia, in industry, and now in the fight against health disparities throughout the world.”

Yamada joins a list of American recipients that includes former Presidents George Bush and Ronald Reagan; Secretary of State Colin Powell, General Norman Schwartzkopf; actor Bob Hope; composer/conductor Andre Previn; director Steven Spielberg and Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, who was given the honor in 2005.

Comments | More in Biotechnology, Personalities, Philanthropy

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