Follow us:

Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

July 24, 2008 at 1:27 PM

Microsoft buying high-end data warehousing company DATAllegro

Microsoft said today it intends to buy Aliso Viejo, Calif.,-based DATAllegro, a data warehousing appliance company.

Venture-backed DATAllegro has had its products on the market since 2003. Its approach is to a distribute data across multiple servers and then run database queries in parallel. That was combined with hardware and storage in what’s known as a data warehousing appliance.

Microsoft already has server software for data warehousing and storage. It’s called SQL Server and it recently launched a new version. DATAllegro, will “take our data platform to the highest scale of data warehousing,” Ted Kummert, the Microsoft executive in charge of data storage, said in a statement.

DATAllegro’s appliances can handle capacities of “hundreds of terabytes on a single system,” Microsoft said, compared with 25 or fewer terabytes of storage for many warehousing appliances.

Per a spokesman, Microsoft plans to retain “most” of DATAllegro’s employees. The company will keep its headquarters and continue work on its technology. It will show up in a future version of SQL Server.

Bob Muglia, senior vice president of Microsoft’s Server and Tools business, is addressing the audience at the company’s Financial Analyst Meeting now. I’ll update this post if he has anything to add about DATAllegro.

Update, 1:53 p.m.: Muglia said DATAllegro will help Microsoft compete with Oracle for the highest-end enterprise data storage customers. “We’ve never been able to do that before,” he said. DATAllegro will allow Microsoft to offer storage capacity “well beyond what Oracle is able to do today.”

Comments | More in Enterprise, FAM 2008, Server and tools

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►