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January 12, 2012 at 1:12 PM

CES 2012: Striiv strives to go pedometers one better

LAS VEGAS — Striiv, a company based in Redwood City, Calif., didn’t have a booth at CES. But we found Lexy Franklin, head of design and strategy, at CES talking about the little device his company is trying to get the word out about.

The device is also called Striiv, and it aims to go one better than pedometers, not only monitoring the steps you take everyday but adding a dose of motivation.

Striiv.JPG

Here’s how it works. Like a pedometer, Striiv, which can be be clipped to your clothes or belt or kept in a pocket or purse close to the body, monitors your steps as well as the number of stairs you’ve taken, miles you’ve walked, calories you’ve burned.

Then it adds in a motivation component. The first layer of motivators simply encourage you to beat your average (number of steps or stairs climbed) or to set a new personal best. A second layer allows you to take part in a walkathon. Striiv will donate money to charity based on the amount of activity you do. A third layer is an online game, kind of like Farmville, where you can grow plants online — but only if you expend enough energy by walking or doing other activities.

There’s also a social component where you can challenge your friends or family members who also have a Striiv device to everything from being first to walk a city block to first to climb (virtually) the Eiffel Tower. You can set your own prizes such as loser having to do the dishes.

Striiv, which launched eight weeks ago, is available at Best Buy and Amazon for $99.

Here’s Franklin talking about Striiv:

[do action=”custom_iframe” width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/UxMczWJTUBE

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