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May 4, 2012 at 8:48 AM

Microsoft wins United Way Summit award for community impact

United Way on Thursday awarded Microsoft a Summit award for community impact, lauding the company’s work creating opportunities for young people.

Among such work that United Way highlighted was Microsoft’s Partners in Learning program, which helps teachers build their skills, share best practices and innovate in their classrooms, and EduConnect, where Microsoft employees who participate teach math and science in local schools.

United Way also recognized Microsoft’s charitable giving as a whole, saying the company and its employees donated $100.5 million to nonprofits and educational institutions last year and, additionally, gave $844 million in software to more than 40,000 nonprofits worldwide, including United Way.

Microsoft has a company-match program for employee giving and also to match employees’ volunteer hours. Last year, employees volunteered 426,000 hours, meaning Microsoft contributed $7.2 million in matching funds to U.S. nonprofits.

Also last year, Brad Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel and executive VP, and his wife co-chaired United Way of King County’s annual campaign, the country’s largest United Way campaign. The local campaign raised $111 million, with $25 million of that going to expand United Way of King County’s Parent-Child Home Program, which provides trained, certified home visitors and early literacy resources for low-income families to help children and families prepare for kindergarten, according to United Way.

Other 2012 Summit award winners include Bank of America and General Motors, with the top Spirit of America award going to Procter & Gamble for its philanthropy, volunteer efforts and community impact.

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