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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

October 10, 2012 at 10:59 AM

Microsoft gave $900 million to nonprofits last year

Microsoft’s U.S. employees, with the help of the company match program, contributed $99.8 million in cash to nonprofits in the past fiscal year, while the company itself gave $900 million in cash and in-kind software donations to more than 62,200 nonprofits worldwide.

That’s according to Microsoft’s annual Citizenship Report, which details the company’s community involvement efforts.

Since 1983, the report says, Microsoft employees — along with the company match — have contributed $946 million to nonprofits worldwide, with that figure likely to reach $1 billion by the end of this calendar year.

The $900 million the company gave for the fiscal year that ended June 30 is lower than the $949 million the company gave in fiscal 2011. But the amount raised by U.S. employees, along with the company match, went up by $6.4 million from $93.4 million in FY11. (Employees donated $47.6 million in FY12, with the company match for that totalling $52.2 million.)

Here are some other highlights from the report:

  • U.S. employees volunteered 431,608 hours, up from 383,566 in FY11.
  • The percentage of minorities in Microsoft’s U.S. workforce went up slightly, from 35 percent in FY11 to 36 percent in FY12.
  • The percentage of women in Microsoft’s global workforce remained flat at 24 percent.
  • The company says it reduced its carbon emissions by 30 percent per unit of revenue compared with 2007, and is working toward the goal of being carbon neutral in FY13.
  • The company also says 90 percent of employees responding to an employee poll said they felt proud to work at Microsoft, up from 86 percent last year.

The full report is here.

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