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November 13, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Eric Rudder, Harry Shum take on new senior leadership roles at Microsoft

Longtime Microsoft executives Eric Rudder and Harry Shum are moving into new roles in the company, with Shum moving up into the senior leadership ranks.

Eric Rudder (Photo from Microsoft)

Eric Rudder (Photo from Microsoft)

Rudder will take on the newly created title of executive vice president for advanced strategy. As such, he will be responsible for key cross-company tech initiatives (though the company is not saying what those initiatives are for competitive reasons). He will remain on the senior leadership team — the company’s highest level of leaders.

Rudder currently is executive vice president of advanced strategy and research, overseeing Microsoft Research as well as trustworthy computing. He had also served as the company’s chief technical strategy officer.

Harry Shum (Photo from Microsoft)

Harry Shum (Photo from Microsoft)

Harry Shum will be taking over Rudder’s role overseeing Microsoft Research and trustworthy computing. He will gain the title of executive vice president for technology and research, and become part of the senior leadership team.

Shum currently leads Bing engineering and, before that, led Microsoft Research in China.

Both will report to CEO Steve Ballmer and will take on their new roles in mid-December.

Here is Ballmer’s email to employees on the moves:

From: Steve Ballmer
To: Microsoft – All Employees
Date: Nov. 13, 2013
Subject: New Roles for Eric Rudder and Harry Shum

Today, I’m excited to announce new roles for Eric Rudder and Harry Shum. Eric will take on a newly created role as Executive Vice President, Advanced Strategy, and Harry will take on Eric’s current responsibilities as Executive Vice President, Technology & Research. Both Eric and Harry will report to me and both changes take effect in mid-December.

Eric has led our Advanced Strategy & Research group for the past year. In that time, the team has tightened the connection between our incredible MSR work and the devices and services we are bringing to market while advancing the ball on a number of critical strategy and policy issues. As we continue our transformation to a company that delivers high value activities through devices and services it is critical that a senior leader is accountable for certain key, cross company technology initiatives. In this new role, Eric will do just that.

Harry Shum currently leads Bing engineering and prior, he led our MSR China team. He is uniquely positioned to drive exceptional forward-looking research that pushes the frontiers of computer science, while also driving impactful technology transfer through deep connections with our product teams.

MSR has been an amazing source of innovation for Microsoft and the industry, and our commitment to cutting edge R&D is as strong as ever. You only have to look at some of our big technology bets like Xbox, Bing or Windows Azure to see the great collaboration that MSR has brought to help accelerate our efforts to deliver differentiated devices and services to our customers.

With Harry moving to this new role, the Bing engineering leaders will report directly to Qi Lu on an interim basis. They will not miss a beat as they continue the strong momentum in growing share, improving financials, and leveraging search as a strategic differentiator across our devices and services.

Please join me in thanking both Eric and Harry for their leadership and congratulating them on their new roles.

Steve

Comments | More in Microsoft | Topics: eric rudder, harry shum, senior leadership team

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