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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Janet I. Tu.

January 15, 2014 at 6:08 PM

Longtime video and entertainment executive Blair Westlake leaves Microsoft

The latest in a line of executives to leave Microsoft since the company began a huge reorganization last July is Blair Westlake, who most recently was vice president of the Media and Entertainment group at Microsoft.

Westlake, an entertainment industry veteran, served as Microsoft’s liaison with the media and entertainment industries and led a group responsible for business development and content licensing for services and devices including Xbox Video, Xbox Music, and Windows PCs, tablets and phones, according to his LinkedIn profile. Westlake was in that job for about 10 years.

“It has become clear to me that the organization is moving in a direction that does not fit either my expertise or my skill sets,” Westlake said in a statement, as reported in Variety.

“Over the last few months Microsoft has been undergoing a large-scale reorganization,” Westlake continued to say in the statement printed in Variety. “During that period, I have had the privilege of working with numerous talented and professional people. While I will miss their company and our interaction, I truly believe that this move is in the best interest of all parties concerned.”

Microsoft issued a statement, saying: “We can confirm that Blair is leaving Microsoft after nearly ten years. We thank him for his contributions and wish him well in his new endeavors.”

Prior to Microsoft, Westlake had served as chairman of Universal Television & Networks Group and had been an executive at Universal.

Comments | More in Microsoft | Topics: blair westlake, reorganization

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