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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

November 10, 2014 at 12:50 PM

Longtime Microsoft HR chief Lisa Brummel to leave at year-end

Lisa Brummel, who has led Microsoft human resources for nearly a decade, will step down at the end of the year.

Lisa Brummel (Photo: Microsoft)

Lisa Brummel (Photo: Microsoft)

Brummel, a 25-year veteran of the company and part-owner of the Seattle Storm, joined Microsoft in 1989 after earning a master’s in business administration from UCLA. She has held a variety of roles in management and marketing in Microsoft’s hardware, consumer and productivity businesses, and has led human resources since 2005.

For more on Brummel, see colleague Jerry Brewer’s 2012 profile of her here.

She will be succeeded in the HR post by Kathleen Hogan, who currently leads Microsoft Services.

Microsoft Services, with about 21,000 employees, is the largest single organization within the company. It essentially is Microsoft’s customer support and consulting network.

Kathleen Hogan (Photo: Microsoft)

Kathleen Hogan (Photo: Microsoft)

Hogan joined Microsoft in 2003, and previously worked for the McKinsey consulting firm, as well as Oracle.

Hogan will join Microsoft’s leadership team on Nov. 28 and report to Chief Executive Satya Nadella, the company said. Brummel, 55, will stay at Microsoft through the end of the year to assist with the transition.

“Kathleen is an accomplished, well-respected and well-rounded leader who obsesses over our customers and is motivated by people’s passion for how technology can change the world,” Nadella said. “She is the right person to continue pushing our cultural transformation forward, and she will ensure Microsoft remains the best, most inclusive place to work.”

 

 

 

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