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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Matt Day.

Category: RFID
September 10, 2007 at 6:23 PM

RFID chips and cancer — ask Amal

Embedding microchips in humans scares some people on privacy grounds alone. Now the chips are raising alarms for a different reason — a potential link to cancer. Studies done in the 1990s found that chip implants had “induced” malignant tumors in lab mice and rats, according to this AP story. The Food and Drug Administration approved…

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Comments | More in Chips and semiconductors, Public policy & issues, RFID

March 7, 2007 at 10:52 AM

Impinj raises $19 million in VC

Impinj, which develops semiconductors based on RFID technology, said today that it has raised $19 million in venture capital. AllianceBernstein, one of the world’s largest asset management firms, led the round, with all previous investors also participating. They include Arch Venture Partners, GF Private Equity Group, Madrona Venture Group, Mobius Venture Capital, Polaris Venture Partners…

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February 20, 2007 at 10:05 AM

Does RFID use need regulation?

Jeff Morris thinks so. Morris, chairman of the state House Committee on Technology, Energy and Communications, has been looking into radio frequency technology for years now. This story on his bill doesn’t have any comment from Morris. He has said in the past that he does not want to constrain the technology, but he does…

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February 12, 2007 at 2:39 PM

Impinj technology used to tag prescription drugs

Seattle chip supplier Impinj announced a significant deal today to apply its radio frequency technology to the pharmaceutical industry. Purdue Pharma, which makes OxyContin and other prescription pain medication, will use Impinj RFID chips and readers in its high-speed packaging lines starting this spring. The drug company said item-level RFID tags, which store a unique ID…

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November 14, 2006 at 1:16 PM

Impinj tests RFID tags on pharma bottles

Seattle RFID chip designer Impinj is hailing the reliability of its UHF (ultra high frequency) supply chain technology at a health care industry summit in Washington D.C. Impinj is aiming the RFID tags and readers at the pharmaceutical industry to identify and track prescription drugs. But the industry so far had been leaning toward high frequency…

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October 31, 2006 at 1:48 PM

New RFID implant for humans

The latest scheme for RFID tags is another medical application for microchips implanted in humans. A St. Paul company says it received a U.S. patent last week for a “glucose-sensing RFID implantable microchip” that could allow diabetics to monitor their blood sugar levels. The microchip injected under a person’s skin has a glucose sensor, a passive…

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August 7, 2006 at 2:18 PM

Security holes in new passports

A computer researcher demonstrated late Friday what some experts have long suspected — the data inside new electronic passports that the State Department is introducing this year can be copied, opening the door for criminals to pass themselves off as other travelers. German security researcher Lukas Grunwald of DN-Systems showed how the information stored on…

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July 31, 2006 at 4:55 PM

Impinj getting some competition

Seattle’s Impinj has quietly become the leader in production of cutting edge silicon chips for radio frequency identification tags, the tiny tags used to identify and track goods in manufacturing and retail. Now the company is about to get some competition from Texas Instruments. TI said today it began offering its own so-called Gen…

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June 5, 2006 at 4:49 PM

Active RFID tags in the sky

Boeing took another step toward putting active radio frequency identification tags onto airplane parts by beginning a 120-day test of the tags on board a FedEx plane. Boeing wants to test potential electromagnetic interference from the battery-powered tags, which the FAA has not approved yet. The tags were installed on the flight deck, avionics compartment, cargo…

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