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Microsoft Pri0

Welcome to Microsoft Pri0: That's Microspeak for top priority, and that's the news and observations you'll find here from Seattle Times technology reporter Janet I. Tu.

Topic: brad smith

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March 28, 2014 at 12:16 PM

Microsoft: From now on, we won’t snoop into your email even if we think you’re stealing from us

Microsoft took a lot of criticism last week after it was revealed that the company looked at the email content of one of its customers in the course of tracking down someone suspected of stealing trade secrets from the company.

Now Microsoft is changing its policy, saying that, in such circumstances, it will call in law enforcement to inspect a customer’s content, rather than doing so itself.

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Comments | More in Microsoft | Topics: alex kibkalo, brad smith, privacy

May 14, 2013 at 5:13 PM

Advanced Placement Computer Science now counts toward math and science graduation requirements

Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith, State Rep. Drew Hansen, Gov. Jay Inslee and entrepreneur Hadi Partovi listen to Rainier Beach High School student Ifrah Abshir talk about her love of computer science. (Photo by Janet I. Tu / The Seattle Times)

Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith, State Rep. Drew Hansen, Gov. Jay Inslee and entrepreneur Hadi Partovi listen to Rainier Beach High School student Ifrah Abshir talk about her love of computer science. (Photo by Janet I. Tu / The Seattle Times)

Surrounded by students and teachers from Rainier Beach High School, along with representatives from the high-tech industry, Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill today allowing Advanced Placement Computer Science course to count toward the state’s high school math and science graduation requirements.

AP Computer Science has, since its inception, been an elective, said State Rep. Drew Hansen, D-Bainbridge. Having it count toward graduation requirements is one step toward getting and training more students in the field — one that industry leaders says is facing a shortage of qualified workers.

“We live in a state that is a national leader when it comes to information technology,” said Brad Smith, general counsel at Microsoft, who spoke at the event. “Yet we have jobs that have been open for months…. We are not producing people with the skills needed to fill them.”

Pushing for changes in education and education funding for math, science and technology jobs is one part of a push Microsoft is making in contending with what it and other high-tech leaders say is a sizeable gap between supply and demand for high-tech workers. The other part is pushing to raise the limits on H-1B visas for foreign qualified high-tech workers.

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Comments | More in Microsoft | Topics: brad smith, computer science, education