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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

October 30, 2008 at 3:56 PM

Heading toward Election Day

Obama’s redistribution plan:

Don’t kill the pig

Redistribution of wealth is a key element in Sen. Barack Obama’s vision of change. It has been met with enthusiastic support by many Americans. Unfortunately, the redistribution concept is based more on an irrational hatred of those who have “too much” than on any likelihood that the lives of the recipients will be improved.

Russians tell the following story which bears an uncanny relevance to Obama’s program.

Ivan, a poor Russian peasant, was working in his plot of land when he came across a vodka bottle. He picked it up and out jumped a genie.

“Ivan,” said the genie, “you have found the magic vodka bottle so you are entitled to one wish. Tell me your wish and I will make it come true.”

Ivan thought a while and said, “My neighbor Pavel has a pig but I don’t have any pigs.”

“So you want me to give you a pig?” asked the genie.

“No,” said Ivan. “I want you to kill Pavel’s pig.”

— Arlene Heath, Seattle

Don’t let America be McCain’s sixth loss

So Charles Krauthammer is supporting Sen. John McCain over Sen. Barack Obama [“Obama’s associations are indeed relevant,” syndicated column, Oct. 12].

Well, borrowing from the immortal Gomer Pyle, “sur-prise, sur-prise.” Krauthammer would support a block of wood over Obama and he would concoct a quasi-plausible rationale listing the wonderfulness of wood: A nice-sized chunk of wood would be better than Obama in a fight and the chunk wouldn’t say anything to upset the stock market in these trying times.

A couple of factors easily cancel Krauthammer’s endorsement. For one thing, the intelligence gap: Obama graduated Magna cum Laude from the Harvard Law School whereas McCain was ranked 894th out of a graduating class of 899 at the U.S. Naval Academy. If McCain hadn’t been blessed with a father and grandfather who were both four-star admirals he wouldn’t have graduated at all.

Then there’s the fact that as a pilot he lost five aircrafts. I don’t think it would be easy to find any other pilot with that kind of record. Methinks pappy and grandpappy’s statuses helped keep McCain flying. Not all those losses were held to be McCain’s fault but the pattern is pretty obvious.

It doesn’t seem wise to turn over the helm of our ship of state to such a risky driver.

America shouldn’t be McCain’s sixth loss.

— Bob Wojtyna, Woodinville

Reichert or Burner:

one in a million

I agree with Democratic congressional candidate Darcy Burner on most issues more than I do with Rep. Dave Reichert, but I’m voting for Reichert.

Back when President George W. Bush had high ratings, Reichert stood up to him on the [Terri] Schiavo [case], stem-cell research and other high-profile issues. That shows integrity and courage that matters more than whether he has a D or an R next to his name.

But the main reason I’m voting for Reichert is because he brings unique and valuable experience to Congress. Most of the members of Congress are lawyers or career politicians, along with a few business people and veterans.

Reichert’s decades as sheriff brings wisdom (and adult supervision) to the hysteria regarding how to handle terrorism.

Burner would be just another freshman.

Burner is obviously very smart and hardworking and I’d be glad to vote for her under other circumstances.

We are fortunate to have two good choices in Reichert and Burner. But where Burner would be a very good choice, Reichert is one in a million.

— Greg Lovern, Bellevue

I don’t like any of you

Dear 2008 election candidates:

Some citizens are thankful that the election is almost here and the campaigning can stop.

I have a different view; I am very worried about what you will do after the election.

Over the past 22 months I have watched, listened to and read countless political ads that look like they were created by the same PR company. Uniformly, these ads have taken quotes of the opponent out of context, distorted the truth, told partial truths and made or implied promises that are impossible to keep.

You all said, “I approved this message.” It is sad that our elected leaders have subordinated their personal integrity and honesty in order to win an election, and the so-called agents of change who are challenging are behaving the same way.

While I am tempted to point out the most egregious of your lies and distortions, I won’t because there isn’t enough space in the whole of The Times to contain them.

There was a time I admired and respected elected leaders as accomplished people of the highest integrity. This was somewhat naive on my part, but I had confidence and respect for those leaders.

Now I see trainees with manufactured resumes, imaginary accomplishments and, worst of all, no real integrity that can be seen. I voted for some of you but I am not happy about it.

— Ted Leech, Woodinville

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