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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

November 18, 2008 at 2:55 PM

Indonesian massacre

Just interests, no friends

“Killers regret little about 1960 massacre” [Nation & World, Nov. 16] states that “the men spoke proudly of saving the nation,” that is, Indonesia under the U.S.-embedded Suharto [former Indonesian dictator].

This was reminiscent of another man who spoke exactly the same way, Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay, who said he had absolutely no regrets and had been proud to “serve” — 75,000 people died in both atomic bombs and 396,000 more died as a result of them by the end of 1945.

There has never been an apology for this atrocity carried out by “Christians.” Nor has there been one for the genocide of Native Americans, for the brutal enslavement of Native Africans and for the millions of civilian deaths in Vietnam.

Given this history, Iraq should not expect an apology from the U.S. for laying waste to its civilization anytime soon. The reason the CIA refuses to talk about its role in this and many other atrocities in which it has been directly involved is definitely not because of “national-security reasons.” The real reason is that it doesn’t want to be seen as the terrorist organization that it sometimes is.

It is interesting to note the graphic descriptions of the horror when done at the hand of Muslims, but that are almost completely left out of news stories in The Seattle Times and many other papers when writing about the killing sprees carried out by “Christian” nations.

Christian killers are not called killers at all, but “freedom fighters.” The U.S. propped up Suharto in Indonesia and hung Saddam Hussein for doing the same thing. As Calvin Coolidge said in a truthful moment, “the United States has no permanent friends, just permanent interests.”

— Suzanne Oelke, Seattle

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