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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

November 28, 2008 at 2:04 PM

Washington state education funding cut proposals

Not in Washington

I’m getting really tired of the pattern in your lead editorials lately. Where are your values? Where is your pride?

Sure we have an economic downturn, but draconian cuts to education make no sense [“Initiative-backed education initiatives should be suspended in these tough times,” Editorial, Nov. 25]. Cutting education is no way to fix the economy.

When the chips are down in your family do you just take the kids out of college? Do you stop feeding the baby? Sell your daughter to the highest bidder? And all in the name of protecting your 401(k) so that you can take that world cruise during your retirement? I think Washington state’s values are a little beyond that.

Why is it that if the economy isn’t roaring the public should expect “class sizes will balloon” and “teachers will be very unhappy?” And funding for schools “should be considered good-time proposals”?

In this string of “everything-should-be-cut” editorials, the only thing that seems sacred is the pocketbooks of rich business owners.

“No new taxes.” That may be the values system of the President George W. Bush Republicans, but it’s not part of our values here in Washington.

— Isabel D’Ambrosia, Seattle

At least maintain

As a senior in high school, I am deep within the process of applying to college and concerned to hear about the large budget cuts our local universities are anticipating [“20 percent cuts may be ahead for colleges, universities as bottom falls out of budget,” News, Nov. 23].

A number as high as 20 percent for a budget cut is shocking, and I’m worried to know that our struggling economy has already had such a real, tangible effect on universities that I may one day attend.

I’m also worried about the enrollment cuts threatened by community colleges, as my older brother is currently attempting to transfer to a local community college.

If we can’t foster the resources for higher education, we should at least maintain them. Our economy would benefit from improved higher education in the long run, and cutting the budgets and/or enrollment of our universities is shortsighted at best.

— Lisa Jaech, Seattle

Comments | More in Education, Washington Legislature

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