Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

March 4, 2009 at 8:57 PM

Bill to repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell” military policy

Serving without fear of nonjudicial punishment

It is time to repeal the U.S military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy and allow gay and lesbian soldiers to openly serve their country without fear of nonjudicial punishment, caused by his or her sexual preference.

— Arthur Hall, Bothell

Proving our military is professional and mature

I strongly support a bill offered by Rep. Ellen Tauscher, D-Calf., that would do away with “don’t ask, don’t tell.” There’s good reason to reverse this policy.

First and foremost, fighting the danger to our country that we are, we cannot afford to dismiss any qualified, honorable and able members of our military.

For instance, military intelligence is constantly short-handed when it comes to translators. And yet, hundreds of translators have been dismissed since the policy was enacted, including many who speak Arabic, Persian, Pashto and other languages that could help our military intelligence protect our troops and America.

Additionally, at a time when our military is so overextended, allowing members of the military to serve openly, without being discharged, will alleviate the strain so many of our service members feel from repeated deployments.

Our military is professional and mature. Changing the policy will not affect how service members do their jobs or the military’s overall cohesiveness.

In fact, it only will make our military stronger.

— Donna Mansfield, Kirkland

Alleviating burden of being overstretched and overtaxed

The burden of duty placed on the military and their families could be averted if we stop this nonsense and allow competent people to serve our country.

America can no longer dismiss qualified and able members of the military because of their sexual orientation. This is a privacy issue, and we can no longer continue on this path, especially now that our military is so overstretched and overtaxed.

Changing the policy of “don’t ask, don’t tell” will make us stronger not weaker. We all love this country.

— Julie Burrell, Lake Forest Park

Comments | More in Gay rights, military

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►