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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

March 30, 2009 at 4:00 PM

Okanogan wolf killing

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AP Photo / US Fish & Wildlife

A gray wolf rests in tall grass in this undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Stand up for endangered species

Editor, The Times:

The unconscionable killing of two young gray wolves of the Lookout Pack in the Methow Valley is horrible beyond belief [“Bloody box tips officials to Okanogan wolf killing,” Times, page one, March 28]. The greed and insensitivity of humans, who are actually far more dangerous than wolves, is deplorable and must be exposed and opposed.

Several conservation groups have been working together in coalition since last summer to educate the public about the importance of wild wolves and other predators in the ecosystems of our state. These include the North Cascades Conservation Council’s Wolf Working Group, the Wildlife Coalition of the National Parks Conservation Association, the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club, and Conservation Northwest.

We have been collecting signatures on a petition to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. We are urging Fish and Wildlife to formulate wolf-conservation policy based on sound science — not to allow the producers (ranchers and sheep growers) to control the policymaking process.

A government-sponsored survey found that 75 percent of Washington’s citizens support wolf recovery in our state. It is time for concerned citizens to stand up for an endangered species, the noble gray wolf, and tell the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to manage the gray wolf according to sound science.

Enforcement of laws against killing gray wolves must also be a top priority as our endangered species struggle to survive in a profit-driven culture.

— Rebecca Wolfe, Edmonds

Senseless killing

I read in total disbelief about the senseless killing of one of our new wolf pack members in Methow Valley by a rancher.

Washington state should be lucky to have a more-balanced ecosystem with the appearance of a new wolf pack from Canada. There was no cause to kill the animal since it has not threatened the rancher’s livestock,

On top of that, [the rancher] tried to profit from the wolf pelt. Are we back in trophy times?

I hope [the rancher] gets the proper punishment and a hefty fine for his arrogance and lawlessness.

— Tamara Wulff, Lynnwood

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