Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

June 2, 2009 at 4:00 PM

Referendum 71

Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times

Gov. Chris Gregoire is surrounded by politicians, press and onlookers last month as she signs one of three bills that gives registered gay couples in Washington state everything but marriage. Referendum 71 attempts to overturn the 2009 Domestic Partnership Expansion Bill.

Naming signers publicly exposes personal beliefs

Editor, The Times:

We are apparently beginning our journey toward fascism [“Group wants to name names,” NWTuesday, June 2]. I don’t know exactly when freedom died, but we are now apparently all required to think the same thoughts and believe the same things under threat of being publicly exposed and ridiculed for our personal beliefs.

I sincerely hope the ACLU speaks out against the actions of these groups just as vigorously as they whined about the possibility that the government might be monitoring us when we checked out “Terrorism for Dummies” from the local library.

— Les Iwamasa, Seattle

Heterosexual divorce, abuse — what is there to protect?

Larry Stickney of Protect Marriage Washington casts himself as victim of bigotry and hatred? Oh, really?

Isn’t this the same Larry Stickney who respects the “sanctity of marriage” so much that he has been married three times? Does he know what “for better or worse” means? Does he know what a sacred vow is?

Isn’t this the country where more than 50 percent of heterosexual marriages end in divorce, and where spousal and child abuse is rampant?

Just whom are we protecting the “sacred institution of marriage” from?

— Jim Conchie, Seattle

Group notifying signers, fair and square

Intimidation often requires that the intimidated is put in a situation that she or he cannot get out of: a trap. Traps are sprung by surprise.

Public notice has been given to anyone on either side of the Referendum 71 issue about what WhoSigned.org is planning. Anyone can figure out how to avoid being intimidated or even approached about signing a public document. If you don’t want to have a conversation with your neighbor, or you fear intimidation, it is simple — don’t sign.

— Bill Dubay, Seattle

Comments | More in Gay rights

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►