Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

July 6, 2009 at 4:00 PM

Exotic animals: Enforcement needed to prevent cruelty, save lives

Imported animals are slaves bred for a profit

It is so unfortunate that people continue to breed animals for profit. It is even more disturbing when it concerns exotic animals. There should be a law against it.

The article “Spokane-area couple raise baby giraffe at home” [NWTuesday, June 30] denotes that it is a way of life for this couple to breed and produce expensive giraffes and other exotic animals, too. Indeed, they are pretty safe with a “gentle giraffe,” as they describe Karson, their new expensive menagerie addition.

I admit that giraffes are not as dangerous as chimpanzees or pet pythons. But it is still wrong and arrogant to bring up these animals that belong in the wild — and instead raise them in a ranch in a country that is not theirs.

We used to bring slaves from Africa. The new slaves are these exotic animals uprooted from their birthplace and bred here in the name of profit.

— Claudine Erlandson, Shoreline

Laws needed to stop global animal trade

How many more deaths of innocent children and adults [“Pet python escapes, strangles girl, 2,” News, July 2] — and untold animal suffering — is it going to take before we get effective legislation that bans ownership of wild animals?

Wild animals are treated as a novelty, apparently to satisfy a sick need of some eccentric people who can’t be satisfied with an already domesticated type of pet. There’s always the potential of danger to people, especially children. There’s seldom anything but misery for the animals. Deprived of companionship with mates, they stay in an unnatural environment in a private home — and that’s only part of the story.

As long as there’s demand there will be unscrupulous dealers who operate globally. Animals are captured in the wild, shipped around the world in deplorable conditions to avoid tracing from the countries of origin, which may have some nominal laws against the trade.

A high percentage of animals die during transport, which, like in so many other animal enterprises, is considered only a normal cost of doing business.

The U.S. could make a significant dent in the sordid trade by enacting laws that prohibits private ownership of wild animals.

— Ruth Kildall, Seattle

Comments | More in animals, Pets

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►