Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

August 28, 2009 at 4:00 PM

Boeing: Why would company move to S. Carolina?

Boeing built by region, owes much in return

Editor, The Times:

Those Boeing officials who are considering manufacturing the 787 Dreamliner in South Carolina should study the company’s history.

It was the natural resources of the Pacific Northwest out of which Boeing was created and built. Early on, it was the spruce forests of Oregon and Washington. Then it was the region’s abundant and low-cost water power that generated the large amount of electricity needed to make aluminum when that became the basic material in airplane manufacture.

Throughout, it was the local intellectual, educational and governmental infrastructure, largely paid for by Washington taxpayers, that trained and nurtured a work force capable of designing and manufacturing great airplanes. South Carolina cannot take credit for any of this. Boeing, having capitalized on these resources, owes something in return.

— Fred Granata, Lake Oswego, Ore.

Union members need to be team members

When will Everett’s Mayor Ray Stephanson and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers Union understand why Boeing is seeking permits for a 787 Dreamliner final-assembly plant in South Carolina? [“Boeing expansion: permits not required,” Opinion, editorial, Aug. 28.]

Boeing doesn’t want to deal with striking union members. IAM members are being lead down a dark path with no future. IAM’s leaders are relics from the past, and their strong-arm tactics are tiresome.

Consider these things: Boeing’s nonunion employees look for ways to improve processes to stay competitive, you’re encouraged to do the bare minimum; a company needs team members working toward a common goal, you’re labeled as adversarial antagonists by the public; Boeing is in business to make money for everyone’s benefit, not be held for ransom losing billions of dollars in revenue and forcing customers to look elsewhere while you’re on strike; the list goes on.

Boeing doesn’t want volatile workers on their payroll and neither would you. Boeing doesn’t have to negotiate with the IAM anymore, they’ll just move away. IAM members have a chance to think for themselves and do what’s right for Boeing, its entire work force, its customers and suppliers.

Be team members and change for the better.

— Conrad Rupp, Renton

Boeing going elsewhere doesn’t produce results

I think the point has been proven that Boeing aircraft manufacturing must not move from the Seattle area. See what is happening when other parts of the nation and world try to build parts for the new Dreamliner 787? Wrinkles in the fuselage? Come on.

It looks like the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers union strike didn’t have much to do with the delay of first delivery, although I hope the union and Boeing can work out a deal to avoid such hassles in the future.

Keeping it all here will build the best airplanes available.

— Douglas Mays, Seattle

Comments | More in aviation, Boeing, Business, Economy, Labor, Seattle, University of Washington

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►