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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

April 18, 2013 at 9:08 AM

Bombs over Boston

The need for surveillance

In this April 15, 2013 photo, an injured person is helped on the sidewalk near the Boston Marathon finish line following an explosion in Boston. The bombs that made Boston look like a combat zone have also brought battlefield medicine to their civilian victims. A decade of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan has sharpened skills and scalpels, leading to dramatic advances that are now being used to treat the 13 amputees and nearly a dozen other patients still fighting to keep damaged limbs. (AP Photo / MetroWest Daily News, Ken McGagh)

An injured person is helped on the sidewalk near the Boston Marathon finish line following an explosion in Boston. The bombs that made Boston look like a combat zone have also brought battlefield medicine to their civilian victims. (AP Photo / MetroWest Daily News, Ken McGagh)

When will the American Civil Liberties Union and their ilk give up on the privacy issue and admit that security cameras, owned and controlled by city government, are a civil good [“Two bombs rock Boston Marathon,” front page, April 16]?Or will we continue to rely on voluntary installation by individuals and businesses who can control when their cameras are operating and how long they must keep their contents? Do we need a Boston here in order to open their eyes?Similarly, how many dollars would be saved if graffiti artists and other vandals could be observed by random drone flights? A child can make a monster go away by closing its eyes; a city cannot.

Robert E. Gardner, Renton

Obamacare will scare off quality doctors

The Boston trauma surgeons were incredible; only three lives have been lost [“Two bombs rock Boston Marathon,” front page, April 16]. Boston is the medical capital of America.

I noticed that the chief of trauma surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital had an accent, as well as the emergency-room head. I thought: “America’s health-care system is the best in the world and attracts the best from everywhere.”

But then I realized we just passed Obamacare.

Socializing health care creates less incentive for the world’s brightest doctors to come to America. If they’re rewarded less — as they will be under Obama Care’s government-centered approach — they’ll go elsewhere.

America attracts the best health professionals because our for-profit system rewards them for their talent and hard work. A more collectivized, communalized nonprofit system would do this less. The more a nation or industry is socialized, the less talent it will attract.

Jeff E. Jared, Kirkland

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