Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

June 4, 2013 at 1:39 PM

Food workers demonstrate

Franchise pays wages, not corporation

Demonstrators on Thursday enter a McDonald's on Fifth Avenue near Seattle Center calling for better wages and urging workers there to join them in walking off the job, but they were unsuccessful. Similar demonstrations took place in New York, Chicago, St. Louis and Milwaukee. (Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Demonstrators on Thursday enter a McDonald’s on Fifth Avenue near Seattle Center calling for better wages and urging workers there to join them in walking off the job, but they were unsuccessful. Similar demonstrations took place in New York, Chicago, St. Louis and Milwaukee. (Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

The organizers of today’s food-service worker’s strike claim that large corporations can afford to raise wages because of record profits [“Fast-food workers protest,” NWFriday, May 31].Yes, it is true that Subway, for example, has record profits, but Subway Corp. does not pay the workers’ wages. The wages are paid by the franchise, by a small-business man who does not have record profits.

I am the bookkeeper for a man who owns several Subways. We are going to distribute a payroll on Monday. If we paid $15 an hour, it would be about 63 percent bigger. I can assure you he would not be in business very long with that kind of payroll.

We also had a five-figure amount extracted from our checking account this week by the state of Washington to pay sales tax. I wonder what we could pay our workers if we were relieved of that burden.

Mark Strobach, Seattle

Comments | Topics: demonstration, fast food, pay

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►