Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

July 16, 2013 at 5:56 AM

Pushing for better education

Funding plays a huge role

I read with interest Christine Johnson-Duell’s guest column comparing Brookline, Mass. and Seattle public-high schools. [“A push for better education,” Opinion, July 13.]

I also attended Brookline High School in the late 1970s, and I received a very good education there. My son goes to Cleveland High School in Seattle, a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) option school.

I sometimes find myself wishing I had the kind of experience that he has been getting. He gets to go to school with a much more diverse group of students than I did and has made friends with people of all kinds of cultures.

He gets to do project-based learning with highly talented teachers, under the supervision of staff members who have a level of personal involvement with the students that I never saw at Brookline High School.

I agree with Johnson-Duell that funding plays a huge role. Cleveland is more well-funded than many Seattle schools. But it’s also worth noting that we have a lot going for us here in Seattle.

Peter Gruenbaum, Seattle

It is time for voters to step up

Thanks to Christine Johnson-Duell for her balanced, temperate account of the shortfalls in Washington’s public-education system.

There are many problems in providing public education, and some of them cannot be solved immediately. But some of the problems can be solved or at least severely moderated by increasing the resources available.

Money won’t solve all the system’s problems, but it still matters greatly. Parents understand that, and routinely choose schools that have more current books, better-equipped libraries, safer buildings, more experienced teachers, better art and music programs, fuller language programs and more highly trained counselors — all of which cost money.

Johnson-Duell suggests addressing this shortfall through a moderate income tax. The urban legend is that Washington voters will never accept an income tax, a legend that paints us as voters apparently so blinded by self-interest that our wallets are more important than our children.

Legend aside, the truth is the vast majority of us care about Washington’s children and recognize the undeniable benefits that flow to our community from a sound public education system.

Isn’t it time for us to stop sheltering in the legend and to deal with a system which has denied so many of our children the education that they deserve and that we need?

William Andersen, Seattle

Comments | More in Education | Topics: education, funding, high school

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►