Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

August 6, 2013 at 11:37 AM

Stepping up to help the homeless

Everyone should contribute

Jamie Mann holds a sign that explains the cause of the Nickelsville residents that will be forced to leave their encampment. [Steve Ringman, The Seattle Times.]

Jamie Mann holds a sign that explains the cause of the Nickelsville residents that will be forced to leave their encampment. [Steve Ringman, The Seattle Times.]

If you want to know what is next in helping people who are homeless, your paper might promote an increase in county and city taxes that would be allocated specifically for more emergency services and affordable housing. [“Editorial: Who will step up to help the homeless?”, Opinion, Aug. 4.]

Across the board, churches and faith-based organizations already carry their fair share and more in providing emergency services for homeless people.

The responsibility of addressing this crisis in our community rests with the entire population of King County and the city of Seattle, especially those residents whose annual income exceeds $100,000.

Increased revenue through equitable taxation is the fairest way to share in this responsibility. Your question, “Who will step up to help the homeless?” can be answered in one word: Everyone!

Rev. Ron Moe-Lobeda, University Lutheran Church, Seattle

Regional efforts must continue

Hannah Saito, 12, prays at Community Dinners church at the Bitter Lake Community Center on May 19. [Erika Schultz, The Seattle Times.]

Hannah Saito, 12, prays at Community Dinners church at the Bitter Lake Community Center on May 19. [Erika Schultz, The Seattle Times.]

Today I saw one of my neighbors at a University District church’s feeding program for people who are homeless and otherwise in need. He wasn’t there as a volunteer; he came to get a meal.

I was surprised, until I thought about the effect of the recession on middle- and low-income people. Locally, one in five children is at risk of hunger, according to United Way of King County. The lack of affordable housing in this area, coupled with high unemployment, is a major barrier to economic stability.

I’m troubled by this editorial and by some of our Seattle City Council members, who prefer foisting responsibility from government onto churches — who are already doing so much to provide food and shelter — and pitting Seattle against neighboring cities.

To end hunger and homelessness, we need continued efforts as a region, with government, faith communities, nonprofits, private funders and individual residents all unified against poverty.

Catherine Hinrichsen, Seattle

Comments | More in homeless, Politics, Seattle | Topics: churches, congregations, food and shelter

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►