Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

August 31, 2013 at 8:04 AM

Raising the minimum wage for fast-food workers

The worst thing we can do

Angeles Solis (middle left) and Yecenia Morales-Garcia, members of United Students Against Sweatshops, chant in solidarity outside the Broadway Subway during a demonstration and walkout of fast food and coffee shop employees on Broadway Ave. on Capitol Hill Aug. 29. The rally was part of a nationwide protest, spanning to New York and Detroit, of low-wage laborers demanding a $15 per hour minimum wage. [Lindsey Wasson, The Seattle Times.]

Angeles Solis (middle left) and Yecenia Morales-Garcia, members of United Students Against Sweatshops, chant in solidarity outside of a Subway during a demonstration and walkout of fast food and coffee shop employees on Broadway Ave. on Capitol Hill Aug. 29. The rally was part of a nationwide protest, spanning to New York and Detroit, of low-wage laborers demanding a $15 per hour minimum wage. [Lindsey Wasson, The Seattle Times.]

As much as many fast-food workers want to make a living wage from a job traditionally held by high-school and college students, the worst thing we can do is to allow these folks to set this job as their career. [“Fast-food workers take to the streets for $15 an hour pay,” NW Friday, Aug. 30.]

Will they go to community college with some of the increased wages? Will they try to improve their employment? Some will, but many won’t, languishing in a job not meant to be a living wage position.

Then, the young and students will have fewer jobs to experience the working world, and lack the personal skills that retail positions definitely teach.

Do these folks understand what other jobs pay this wage scale? Most are a lot more skilled than them, many with college degrees. Yes, some parts of the country should up the minimum wage, but our state leads the nation.

Here is another thought: these folks should try joining a union, paying their monthly dues, and hoping the strong-arms can further their cause. Aside from the physically or mentally challenged employees, I have to say to the rest, step up and improve your situation, it’s not my responsibility.

Oh yes, and wait till the layoffs start, and they would, bet on it!

Richard Eirich, Kirkland

0 Comments | More in Economy, Politics, Seattle | Topics: costs, education, fast food

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►