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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

September 5, 2013 at 7:32 AM

Brutality rises in Iraq

What have we gained?

Mourners carry a coffin of a car bomb victim during the funeral in the Shiite holy city of Najaf,  Iraq, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013. The killings come amid a spike in deadly violence in recent months as insurgents try to capitalize on rising sectarian and ethnic tensions. The scale of the bloodshed has risen to levels not seen since 2008, a time when Iraq was pulling back from the brink of civil war. [AP Photo]

Mourners carry a coffin of a car bomb victim during the funeral in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, Iraq, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013. The killings come amid a spike in deadly violence in recent months as insurgents try to capitalize on rising sectarian and ethnic tensions. The scale of the bloodshed has risen to levels not seen since 2008, a time when Iraq was pulling back from the brink of civil war. [AP Photo]

I’m writing in response to the recent article in The Times, about video proof of violence in Iraq. I’m puzzled. [“Videos show rising brutality in Iraq,” News, Aug. 31.]

Let’s recap: The U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003 to ferret out its weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and to oust President Saddam Hussein.

Hussein was considered by some to be the main instigator of the prevalent Shiite-Sunni conflicts in Iraq. There was also vague harrumphing about his allowing an active al-Qaida presence there.

As we all know, there were no WMD and Saddam Hussein, despite being no angel, had managed to keep al-Qaida terrorists at bay.

Today in Iraq, 10 years later, countless lives — military and civilian — have been and continue to be lost, hundreds of millions of our tax dollars were spent, and Shiite/Sunni violence is rearing up again. Al-Qaida terrorism is now robust.

What, exactly, have we gained?

Kathy Swoyer, North Bend

0 Comments | More in Foreign policy, Iraq war, Politics | Topics: brutality, iraq, saddam hussein

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