Follow us:

Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

September 16, 2013 at 11:23 AM

Labeling genetically modified foods in Washington

Informing the public

Transgenic soy plants are seen in an Argentina farm field.  [Juan Mabromata/AFP/GettyImages]

Transgenic soy plants are seen in an Argentina farm field. [Juan Mabromata/AFP/GettyImages]

Products containing genetically engineered ingredients are banned outright in many other industrialized nations, or companies are required to provide labeling that indicates their presence in the food supply. [“Monsanto gives $4.6M to foes of GMO labeling,” NW Wednesday, Sept. 11.]

Initiative 522 is not asking for the more extreme option of a ban on genetically modified organisms (GMOs), instead empowering people with information so they can make the best food-choice decisions for their family.

If the presence of sugar, salt and other ingredient information is required to be labeled on consumer-food products, why not the presence of GMOs? The answer is simple: shareholder profit for the companies with vested interests in making their technology hidden and invisible in the food supply so people will never have the choice to knowingly purchase or not purchase their products.

There may be many smoke screens and scare tactics to prevent GMO labeling by the companies with vested interest in GMOs, but none of them will ever address the most fundamental issue involving this matter: the right for a population of people to make informed decisions about what food they ingest.

This is a matter of civil rights, which include informed consent. The people have a right to know exactly what nutrients they are eating. Other states like California have tried to seek the right to informed consumer choices regarding GMOs and failed. Please do not let that happen with Washington. We can set the precedent for the rest of the nation.

Adrian Linton, Mountlake Terrace

0 Comments | More in Economy, Food/nutrition, Politics | Topics: gmo, intiative 522, monsanto

COMMENTS

READER NOTE: Our commenting system has changed. Find out more.

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.


Advertising
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►