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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

September 17, 2013 at 4:41 PM

U.S. involvement in Syria

Not the responsibility of the U.S.

Samantha Power, U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations, speaks during a press conference following a Security Council meeting Syria on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013.  U.N. inspectors said there is "clear evidence" that chemical weapons were used in Syria. [AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews]

Samantha Power, U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations, speaks during a press conference following a Security Council meeting Syria on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. U.N. inspectors said there is “clear evidence” that chemical weapons were used in Syria. [AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews]

I am writing regarding Syria. This is a problem for NATO. [“U.N. probe shows link to Syrian government,” News, Sept. 17.]

Rather than lob bombs at another country with unknown consequences and no clear idea of who the rebels are, how about a worldwide embargo and economic sanctions instead?

All deaths are bad deaths in war; what difference does it make if they are caused by poison gas or obliterating bombs?

Do we really think attacking Syria will keep us safe at home? Vietnam veterans Senator John McCain and Secretary of State John Kerry have short memories. What country was it that dropped napalm and Agent Orange on innocent civilians, and then spent years denying responsibility for our military personnel who were poisoned?

Where is the righteous indignation about Monsanto and other corporations poisoning the environment, oil fracking setting our water on fire, or the failure to contain radiation leaks at the Hanford nuclear power plant?

Concerns for another country’s citizens is hypocritical when we are not taking care of our own. Of course the use of chemical weapons is horrible, but war in any form is horrible; all the more reason to stay out of another one.

Sandra Watkins, Mountlake Terrace

Bad either way

Although clearly a lie, the Russian claim that rebels perpetrated the gas attack in Syria would foster an even greater threat: that the chemical weapons are in the hands of others, outside of the established government’s containment and control.

Angel Hewit, Issaquah

Comments | More in Foreign policy, Middle East, military | Topics: bashar assad, rebels, russia

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