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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

October 4, 2013 at 7:34 PM

Income inequality

Money and control

There is more than good and evil at work when it comes to wealth and power. To have power and control over your opponent is great but the control and power over the lives of thousands is even greater.

What you see in many CEOs and company heads is ego at work. It just so happens having money to buy your ego is another factor of control. Therefore if the job of CEO demands more wealth to protect one’s control and power does it signal success?

Over the years ego trips have become the bane of many CEOs and country leaders. They have cheated for greed and have driven countries into poverty to maintain the power and control over the many. In the end they are disliked by their followers. They have made enemies of their friends. Finally, they have lost their ego through their own actions.

As far as CEOs, it becomes a question of how the success of leadership is achieved if it requires more money to sustain a lifestyle than a corporate budget. Few CEOs and wealthy individuals find it embarrassing to have wealth and still live in a society were poverty is found.

Most however have lost their common sense to egotistic urges. The goals of corporation’s leadership candidates must be investigated to assure common sense, moral and ethical attitudes.

All this brings out the question of confidence of success. If you are confident that your leadership will bring success without wealth then the wealth of your actions will follow. What is done with that wealth is what will decide your fate as a human being.

Jim Morris, Renton

Outlaw the one percent

I just finished reading Paul Krugman’s editorial regarding the hubris of our nation’s richest plutocrats and came away with anger. [“More whining from the plutocrats,” Opinion, Sept. 28.] As an old black leather biker, I long for the good old days when the one-percent term referred to outlawed motorcycle clubs like the Hell’s Angels and Gypsy Jokers. I greatly preferred to be part of that 99 percent.

Jack Robert, Langley

Comments | More in Economy | Topics: 99 percent, income inequality

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