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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

November 1, 2013 at 7:00 PM

GMO labeling won’t inhibit Americans from purchasing products

Ballard High School students share their thougths

Various points of I-522 have been highly debated [“Growing debate over genetically engineered food,” page one, Oct. 29].

Personally, I think if the initiative passed, the Washington state consumer wouldn’t care and would buy the food product anyway. This is the same reason why people might still buy fast food after being shown the amount of calories on the label.

The initiative was written properly because the side opposing the measure argues that some “GMO meat” is not going to be labeled. This is because the food that cattle or other animals eat is genetically modified, but the actual meat is not genetically modified. So that is why “GMO meat” will not be labeled.

Washington farmers should have no reason to be against this bill. The average consumer wants what they want and doesn’t care if food is GMO or not.

Nicholas Yand, Ballard

Right to know won’t affect food prices

Before I heard about I-522, I didn’t know much about GMOs in general. But with the help of my science teacher, I learned that the pro I-522 groups mainly claim that the consumers have the right to know what they’re eating.

Anti I-522 groups claim that passing the initiative would increase food cost for Washington families.

In my class activity, I played the role of the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA’s role is to regulate food and make sure it is safe for the public. It’s hard for the FDA to choose a side because neither side provides enough information to support its claim.

I personally support I-522 because I think people have the right to know what’s in their food and I don’t think it would affect food prices. While a labeling system is already used, it is not hard to label GMO products at the same time.

Tashi Tsering, Seattle

0 Comments | More in Food/nutrition | Topics: I-522, initiative 522

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