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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

November 20, 2013 at 7:00 PM

Boeing 777X aftermath

Don’t follow the mistakes of Detroit

I fear that the Boeing Machinists are on a dangerous course. Perhaps, more appropriately, “the slippery slope of no return” [“States salivating for 777X feast,” page one, Nov. 20].

I would urge all of the involved union members, Boeing and Washington state political leaders to look at the situation in Detroit as a stark reality of what will result from the union’s refusal to face the economic realities of international and interstate competition. I congratulate Gov. Jay Inslee and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray for their efforts in supporting Boeing on this issue.

If the union members think the rejected offer was “a piece of crap,” wait until they see the “shadow of Detroit” settling in on Everett and Puget Sound. This battle will be played out to a “lose-lose” conclusion. Is that the legacy union members and Boeing management want to leave for their children and grandchildren?

Jim Nordahl, Woodinville

Access to airplanes is not a human right

Boeing is a producer of quality aircraft. It is also a provider of quality jobs. If Boeing skimps on either area, the other will also suffer.

Since these dual responsibilities are two sides of the same coin, it is impossible to consider them separately. But while access to airplanes is important, it is not a human right.

Article 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights says that:

• Everyone has the right to work,

• Everyone has the right to equal pay for equal work,

• Everyone who works has the right to just and favorable pay, ensuring for him or herself and his or her family an existence of human dignity,

• Everyone has the right to form and join trade unions for the protection of his or her interests.

We need to start thinking about access to work like we do access to food, shelter, or health care — a human right that must meet certain agreed-upon standards, whether it is privately or publicly managed.

No matter what other goods or services a corporation provides, quality work is its most important product and its most critical public duty.

Jim Strickland, Marysville

Comments | More in Boeing | Topics: Boeing 777X

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