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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

November 27, 2013 at 7:03 PM

Black Friday: ironic after a day of giving thanks

Camping outside of malls and running through stores has become a sport

In this Nov. 26 photo, toy department manager Gayla Harris stocks shelves for Black Friday sales at a Wal-mart store. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

In this Nov. 26 photo, toy department manager Gayla Harris stocks shelves for Black Friday sales at a Wal-mart store. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Black Friday, what was once an innocent marketing scheme among retailers, has recently become a full-out competition to offer the best prices to customers [“Sounds of more jingle in holiday shopping hunt,” page one, Nov. 27].

Ever since the less profitable holiday seasons in 2008 and 2009, big-name stores like Toys ”R” Us, Best Buy, Walmart, Target and Kohl’s have been opening their doors early in hopes of meeting annual earnings.

Earlier this year, retailers announced that they are planning on opening on Thanksgiving Day, earning a new name, Grey Thursday. Do retailers really expect employees to miss out on family celebrations? Traditionally a holiday devoted to spending time with loved ones and giving thanks for what we already have, Thanksgiving has become a day for customers to score the lowest prices on holiday gifts.

Camping outside of malls, running through stores and fighting over the last item just goes to show that customers have literally made a sport out of getting door-buster deals. I think the commercialization of this holiday is a prime example of corporate America’s profit-seeking outlook. It seems to me that this shift in heavy consumerism has invaded a day centered on family.

— Chloe Borba, Seattle

0 Comments | More in Shopping | Topics: Black Friday, Shopping

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