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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

June 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Minimum wage: A $15 wage would knock entry-level job seekers out of the market

The love affair over giving low-wage employees a $15 minimum wage is growing daily ["Workers see $15 wage as 'peace of mind'," Local News, June 1].

Who came up with $15 as what was required to make life easier for these unfortunate people? If I recall, someone who started it all just picked it out of thin air.

From reading the article, I get the impression that this raise would be the salvation for thousands living in the Seattle area. They would now become the new middle class with this increased wealth. Never mind that these are mostly unskilled people in jobs with little to no skill requirements, and are entry-level jobs mostly intended for young people entering the job market where they learn to work, acquire experience in a working environment and acquire a work ethic then move on. These are not intended as career jobs.

If any of these people have been in those jobs for any amount of time, they are either promoted to where they earn more money or they remain there by choice. They are comfortable doing low-skill jobs and do not have any ambition to move upward. These people block entry-level job for our future workforce. They want a pay increase with absolutely zero increase in productivity. For those with ambition, there are programs designed to assist these very people who want to better themselves.

It does not matter that the increase would take place over a few years’ time. It still applies to entry-level job and would knock young people out of the workforce, and creates a new career field that business owners would have to cope with by raising prices, with no benefit to the employers.

Ed Hickey, Oak Harbor

Comments | More in minimum wage | Topics: $15, Ed Hickey, entry-level jobs

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