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Seattle Times letters to the editor

Topic: Peter D. Beaulieu

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February 19, 2014 at 6:02 AM

Death penalty: ending a barbaric practice; treat abortion similarly

The Walla Walla State Penitentiary. (The Seattle Times)

Last weekend, The Seattle Times editorial board reconsidered its position on capital punishment, spurred by Gov. Jay Inslee’s announcement that week of a moratorium on the death penalty while he’s in office. The Times now holds the death penalty as fundamentally flawed, overly expensive and morally wrong, and it is time for it to end in Washington. The best letters on the topic are below:

Ending a barbaric practice

I would just like to voice my enthusiastic support of The Seattle Times’ editorial against the death penalty [“It’s time for the state to end the death penalty,” Opinion, Feb. 18].

America really needs to look over its shoulder and see whom we are teamed up with on this barbaric practice. Hint: None of Western Europe or any other civilized developed nations are with us on this one. Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela and Pope Francis are not with us. Churches, judges and medical personnel who have seen the death penalty in action are not with us.

We need to step up and find a decent solution to administer justice to the criminals whom we believe to be unsafe in the community. Killing is not a business in which the state should be engaged.

Thank you so much for having the insight and the courage to point this out to your readers. You are earning our respect.

Shelley Gibson, Seattle

Treat abortion similarly

Thank you for demanding the end of the death penalty. Now draw up the courage to do the same with abortion. Abortion, like the death penalty, uses violence to solve a complicated social problem. A baby is a human being and not simply fetal tissue. And unlike many prisoners on death row, the baby in the womb is absolutely innocent.

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