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Northwest Voices

Seattle Times letters to the editor

Topic: Seattle

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June 26, 2014 at 6:04 AM

Minimum wage: Executives need to stop complaining

I wish the business community would stop whining about the minimum wage ["A rare voice on minimum wage," Opinion, June 22].  They have been doing this since the minimum wage was initiated and it is really getting old. I would remind them that their employees would appreciate the opportunity to make a profit (and start a savings…

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Comments | More in minimum wage | Topics: Elizabeth M. Williams, Erik Smith, Minimum Wage

June 25, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Universal pre-K: Why should everyone else pay for your children?

This letter may not be popular with many parents, but part of the population will nod in agreement.  Why do so many parents now believe that the general public should be responsible for their child care? ["Voters should thwart attempts to hijack mayor’s pre-K mandate," Opinion, June 19]. Why are the supporters of Initiative 107 pushing…

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Comments | More in Education | Topics: child care, Ed Fannin, education

June 22, 2014 at 10:51 AM

Universal pre-K is needed, but include child-care workers in plan

Those of us who have been caring for young children over the past several decades have placed Initiative I-107 on the ballot. I doubt that The Seattle Times consulted any of us before penning Friday’s editorial [“Voters should thwart attempts to hijack mayor’s pre-K mandate,” Opinion, June 19]. If you work and have a…

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Comments | More in Education | Topics: Early Childhood Education, preschool, Roslyn Duffy

June 4, 2014 at 6:04 AM

Seattle is too hilly for cycling

In 2012, I spent a week in Copenhagen, saw its impressive system of bicycle lanes and visited with friends who don’t own a car and bike many miles to work [“How Seattle can close the cycling gap with Copenhagen,” Opinion, May 30].

But no amount of bicycle lanes and tracks stuck willy-nilly into Seattle’s narrow and hilly streets will make us a Copenhagen. They key difference: Copenhagen is flat.

Without hills, Copenhagen residents of many ages and abilities can use

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Comments | More in bicycling | Topics: bicycles, Copenhagen, cycling

June 2, 2014 at 12:09 PM

Minimum wage: A $15 wage would knock entry-level job seekers out of the market

The love affair over giving low-wage employees a $15 minimum wage is growing daily ["Workers see $15 wage as 'peace of mind'," Local News, June 1]. Who came up with $15 as what was required to make life easier for these unfortunate people? If I recall, someone who started it all just picked it…

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Comments | More in minimum wage | Topics: $15, Ed Hickey, entry-level jobs

May 21, 2014 at 7:05 PM

$15 minimum wage would support a student; encourage the economy instead

$15 would support a student, and many others As a high-school student about to graduate, I believe the change in the minimum wage to $15 would be highly effective for all residents in the Seattle [“New poll shows big support for $15 minimum wage,” Local News, May 14]. This new poll that shows big…

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Comments | More in minimum wage | Topics: $15 minimum wage, Annette Alt, businesses

May 19, 2014 at 6:58 PM

Seattle crime: ‘De-policing’ a troubling trend

I read that police actions on low-level crime have declined by huge percentages over the past few years [“Report cites plunge in SPD enforcement of low-level crime,” Local News, May 14]. Either everyone in Seattle has gotten much nicer, or police are avoiding contact in potentially incendiary situations. After the multitude of accusations, investigations,…

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Comments | More in crime/justice | Topics: crime, Cynthia M. Cole, de-policing

May 11, 2014 at 8:40 AM

Minimum wage: Hard for small businesses, self-employed to adapt

The Seattle Times especially well-written editorial on the minimum wage proposal for the City of Seattle may give pause for those who view a $15-an-hour wage a welcome step up to the middle class for the working poor ["An economic gamble in Seattle as $15 minimum wage becomes reality," Opinion, May 3]. As…

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Comments | More in minimum wage | Topics: $15 minimum wage, John May, Minimum Wage

May 6, 2014 at 12:36 PM

Readers weigh in on Seattle mayor’s plan for a $15 minimum wage

Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times

Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times

Last week, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced a plan to move the city toward a $15 minimum wage, which would be phased in over three to seven years depending on the size of business and whether workers receive tips or benefits in addition to salary.

The Seattle Times wrote in an editorial, “If Seattle must go to $15 — and that appears a political reality — there are elements to like in this deal. It includes significant phase-in time, allowing employers to adjust to higher costs, and it incentivizes businesses to contribute to health care, at least for some time.” And added, “But this should not be considered merely tinkering, but a re-engineering of the Seattle economy.”

Readers have sent in quite a few letters in response to this coverage with their own perspectives of the wage hike. If you’d like to add your voice, send your letter to: letters@seattletimes.com

What’s not being considered by supporters

When columnist Jerry Large asserts that Seattle is a step closer to equality because of reaching an agreement that must be approved by the City Council, he must have ignored several things [“Seattle off to promising start on plan to raise minimum wage,” Local News, May 4].

The increase in hourly wages could be whisked away in a heartbeat by higher rents, higher prices for Big Macs or higher prices at stores in low-income neighborhoods.

Equality in Seattle does not mean a thing for equality for 10,000 or so other places in the United States with slightly less liberal city council members.

There are very few highly desirable or even moderately desirable neighborhoods in King County, and a few thousand dollars more in take-home pay every year will make people not one inch closer to being able to afford a house in one of those neighborhoods.

If the cost of employing a person is higher than the revenue that person brings in, that person won’t be on the payroll for very long. People will lose jobs, and therefore be more unequal to others than before. Some people will get raise, other people will get substantial cuts in income.

Get set for higher inequality, Seattle. You deserve it.

Eric Tronsen, Seattle

Teenagers would need to move out of Seattle to find jobs

It would appear Seattle parents have between four and seven years to move to the suburbs so that they can teach their children the responsibility and value in obtaining a starter job.

From there, teenagers can learn

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Comments | More in minimum wage | Topics: $15 minimum wage, David Smukowski, Elaine Phelps

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