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October 30, 2013 at 4:37 PM

Reader voices: Is it OK to shun Halloween?

Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times

Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times

Is it OK to turn off the porch light, hide in the basement and not open the door on Halloween to give out treats? Our Wednesday editorial, “Don’t be a deadbeat on Halloween,” said no and we asked readers to weigh in with their thoughts. Here are some edited excerpts from reader responses

I love Halloween. Our neighborhood is fairly popular for trick-or-treaters and on average we go through about 25 bags of candy. It is really fun to not only give out candy but to watch kids have such a great time. I have blown out the candle in the pumpkin and turned off the porch light but that is later and only because we had a particularly good year and ran out of candy before we had hoped. Those who turn off the lights and pretend not to be home are the ones missing out.”
— Clarence Geyen, Mill Creek

I’m one of them. Last time I checked, this was still a free country and we can treat … or not, as we choose.”
— Lorna Lou, Mountlake Terrace

I think that’s their prerogative and I don’t think any more or less of them. Halloween is not a mandatory participation activity.”
— Skye Koontz, Seattle

My dogs bark and have to be controlled. I only get teenagers who aren’t in costume and say, ‘I’m dressed as a high school student for Halloween.’ Most parents take their kids to organized events these days, so what’s the point? My light will be off.”
— Hilari Anderson, Seattle

Orthodox Jews, who live in several Seattle neighborhoods, such as Seward Park and Ravenna-Bryant, would not give out Halloween treats because Halloween is a holiday that espouses beliefs and traditions rooted in pagan Samhain and the Christian All Saints Day that are inappropriate for Jews to participate in.”
— Lynn Gottlieb, Seattle

And the growing sense of entitlement continues to spread. I have absolutely no problem with people leaving the light off, going out for the night or just ignoring the doorbell. It’s not something I would do — my wife and I look forward to seeing the costumes each year — but everyone certainly has a right to not spend their money on candy for strangers and to not get up and answer the door every 2 minutes all evening. And if the kids and their parents can’t handle it, too bad. May their bags be filled with Tootsie Rolls.”
— Doug Walsh, Snoqualmie

Comments | More in Discussion | Topics: halloween, Reader voices

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