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August 25, 2014 at 6:06 AM

Seattle Times recommendations for the November 2014 election

Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times

Gabriel Campanario / The Seattle Times

This summer and fall, Seattle Times editorial board members are interviewing candidates in select races for state and federal office, and in pro and con campaigns in statewide and local initiatives. We published our recommendations for the August primary, and many of those endorsements are restated below. We are continuing interviews for the remaining races that will be settled by the November ballot.

If you have questions about King County Elections, call 206-296-VOTE or go to kingcounty.gov/elections.

If you have questions about Snohomish County Elections, call 425-388-3444 or go to the Snohomish County Election division website.

For questions about Washington state elections, go to the Secretary of State election website.

Here are our recommendations for selected races in King and Snohomish counties and for ballot measures. Read how these election endorsements are made, explained by Editorial Page Editor Kate Riley before the August primary.

State ballot measures:

Initiative 591

I-591, is wholly inappropriate, unnecessary and potentially a reckless retreat. It’s hard to discern whether the mushy vague language of the brief initiative is a product of poor writing — or entirely the point. Vote no on I-591.

Initiative 594

I-594 provides a practical expansion of background checks on all gun sales — clarity and consistency to keep guns out of the hands of those who should not have them. I-594 is no protective panacea against the kinds of public assaults Seattle has suffered in recent years. But it is a step forward. Vote yes on I-594.

Read editorial endorsement for I-591 and I-594 –>

Initiative 1351

Endorsement to come

Advisory vote No. 8, SB 6505: a marijuana excise tax

Endorsement to come

Advisory vote No. 9, ESHB 1287: a leasehold excise tax on tribal property

Endorsement to come

Seattle ballot measures:

Propositions 1A and 1B: competing measures on early learning and universal prekindergarten

Endorsements to come

Proposition 1: a King County Metro Transit funding measure

Endorsement to come

Citizen Petition No. 1: monorail

Endorsement to come

State legislative races:

Legislative District No. 1, Representative Position No. 2

Edward Barton, Republican
Edward Barton, first-time candidate for office, displays the intellect and moderation to be a strong lawmaker from the 1st Legislative District, which straddles the King-Snohomish line. He is the better option for voters over the incumbent, state Rep. Luis Moscoso, D-Mountlake Terrace.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 5, Representative Position No. 1

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 5, Representative Position No. 2

Chad Magendanz, Republican
After two years representing Eastern King County’s 5th Legislative District, state Rep. Chad Magendanz easily has earned another term. Magendanz brings much-needed moderation and intellectual rigor to Olympia. His professional and civic résumé — U.S. Navy submarine officer, Microsoft manager and Issaquah School Board president — is impressive.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 11, Representative Position No. 1

Zack-Hudgins

Zack Hudgins, Democrat
Hudgins, a two-term lawmaker with Microsoft and Amazon.com experience, is running unopposed. He has been a leader on higher-education issues, including the Real Hope Act — which extends state financial aid to undocumented students — and extending in-state tuition rates to veterans.

Steve-Bergquist
Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 11, Representative Position No. 2

Steve Bergquist, Democrat
Bergquist, a small-business owner and substitute teacher, gets the endorsement because he is far more capable than his Republican opponent, Sarah Sanoy-Wright. She lacks basic comprehension of a range of issues. Bergquist has a somewhat sparse record in his first two-year term, but represents the interests of his district.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 21, State Senator

Marko-Liias

Marko Liias, Democrat
The editorial board recommends Liias reluctantly over his Republican opponent, Dan Mathews, who ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 2012. Liias is a veteran in Olympia from a supportive district, yet he is reluctant to assert any independence from powerful interests, such as the state’s teachers union. Liias is strong on transportation issues and supports job-creating incentives for high-tech, but he needed a stronger challenger, not a budding perennial candidate.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 21, Representative Position No. 1

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 21, Representative Position No. 2

lillian-ortiz

Lillian Ortiz-Self, Democrat
Lillian Ortiz-Self is reluctantly recommended for election. Ortiz-Self has an academic and professional background in education and counseling, and in management of programs. She says she is cautious about not just dumping money into the K-12 system without ensuring effectiveness, but demonstrated no independence from teachers union positions in an interview.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 23, Representative Position Nos. 1 and 2

Endorsements to come

Legislative District No. 30, State Senator and Representative Position Nos. 1 and 2

Endorsements to come

Legislative District No. 31, State Senator

Cathy-Dahlquist

Cathy Dahlquist, Republican
State Sen. Pam Roach, R-Auburn, the longtime lawmaker best known for her fiery temper, faces a sharp and seasoned opponent this year from within her own party. State Rep. Cathy Dahlquist is the easy choice for the 31st District Senate seat.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No.31, Representative Position No. 1

Drew Stokesbary, Republican
For the open state House seat in the 31st District, Republican Drew Stokesbary of Auburn is the candidate most likely to be a voice for fiscal responsibility. The incumbent, Cathy Dahlquist, is vacating the seat to run for state Senate.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 31, Representative Position No. 2

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 32, State Senator

Chris-Eggen

Chris Eggen, Democrat
Shoreline Deputy Mayor Chris Eggen, a Democrat, is the better choice over the incumbent, state Sen. Maralyn Chase, D-Shoreline, who is seeking a second term. Challenger Eggen is rated “very good” by The Municipal League of King County, compared to Chase’s “good” rating. Eggen knows what is ahead, especially with education.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 32, Representative Position No. 2

Ruth-Kagi

Ruth Kagi, Democrat
Kagi has served in the state Legislature since 1999, and from the beginning she has been a leader on issues for the state’s youngest constituents and struggling families. Kagi chairs the House Early Learning and Human Services Committee, where she is a strong, effective voice for child-sensitive foster-care reforms, family-support services and early learning. She is also on the Appropriations Committee.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 33, State Senator

Karen-Keiser

Karen Keiser, Democrat
Karen Keiser is better qualified than her challenger and has earned another term. After 18 years in the Legislature, Keiser is known as a faithful supporter of labor and an advocate for health-care reform.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 33, Representative Position No. 1

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 33, Representative Position No. 2

Mia Su-Ling Gregerson, Democrat
Mia Su-Ling Gregerson’s record demonstrates her potential to be a thoughtful lawmaker. Despite her near-perfect voting score with the Washington State Labor Council in her first session, Gregerson displays indications of independence.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 34, Representative Position No. 2

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 36, State Senator and Representative Position Nos. 1 and 2

Endorsements to come

Legislative District No. 37, State Senator

Pramila-Jayapal

Pramila Jayapal, Democrat
In a crowded contest for Seattle’s 37th Legislative District state Senate seat, Pramila Jayapal stands out for the breadth and depth of her civic involvement. The Democrat is a passionate and effective social-justice activist, armed with an MBA and experience in the private financial sector. That said, her election would test her ability to balance a progressive streak with pragmatism and the ability to reach across the aisle to find compromise.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 37, Representative Position No. 1

Daniel-Bretzke

Daniel Bretzke, Republican
The 37th Legislative District’s Position 1 needs a legislator willing to compromise and represent the best interests of a diverse district where many schools are struggling and persistent achievement gaps threaten to leave students behind. That means turning out the incumbent, Rep. Sharon Tomiko Santos, in favor of the promising political newcomer, Daniel Bretzke of Seattle.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 37, Representative Position No. 2

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 38, State Senator

John-McCoy

John McCoy, Democrat
McCoy is one of the rare Democratic lawmakers who acknowledges a daunting and perilous link between the education and financing issues of the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision and Initiative 1351. The proposal for lower class size on the November ballot would add only more financial stress.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 38, Representative Position No. 1

June-Robinson

June Robinson, Democrat
Robinson brings a career in public health, housing and human services to her new duties. She has signed the initiative to reduce class size, which comes with an unknown, unfunded price tag.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 38, Representative Position No. 2

Mike Sells, Democrat
Sells is a former teacher in the Everett School District, and a longtime officer of the Snohomish County Labor Council. Sells helped promote the Washington Aerospace Training and Research Center, which opened in 2010. The center draws on local education resources and aerospace employers to train people for industry jobs.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 39, Representative Position No. 2

Endorsement to come

Legislative District No. 41, Representative Position Nos. 1 and 2

Endorsements to come

Legislative District No. 43, Representative Position No. 2

Frank-Chopp

Frank Chopp
After 20 years in elected office, Democrat Frank Chopp remains a relevant and effective representative of the 43rd Legislative District in Position 2.

Read editorial endorsement –>
Steve-Hobbs


Legislative District No. 44, State Senator

Steve Hobbs
During eight years in the state Senate, Lake Stevens Democrat Steve Hobbs has demonstrated a deep streak of independence, and a willingness to work with members of the opposing party.

Read editorial endorsement –>


Legislative District No. 44, Representative Position 1

Rob-ToyerRob Toyer
Rob Toyer, a financial planner, is a Marysville City Council member. His immersion in municipal finance is good preparation for confronting the Legislature’s difficulties.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 44, Representative Position 2

Mark Harmsworth
Mark Harmsworth, a tech consultant, is a Mill Creek City Council member and deputy mayor. He seem far more likely to be a problem-solver, at a time when problems number in the billions.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Andy-HillLegislative District No. 45, State Senator

Andy Hill, Republican
State Sen. Andy Hill, a wonkish, moderate Republican from Redmond, was a calming force in the Legislature’s recent budget storms. He served as the Senate Majority Coalition’s lead budget-writer despite being a first-term rookie, and he helped channel $1 billion more into basic education without significantly raising taxes or doing damage to other vital state services. He deserves particular credit for drawing Democrats into the Republican-led Senate budgeting process.

Roger-Goodman
Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 45, Representative Position No. 1

Roger Goodman, Democrat
Goodman has an admirable track record of working to end sex trafficking and combating domestic violence. As chairman of the Public Safety Committee, Goodman, an attorney, also has a prolific record of tightening state drunken-driving laws. Few lawmakers have passed as many bills as Goodman, who has represented the 45th District since 2006. Goodman’s acquiescence to his party’s hard-left positions on education funding are a serious concern.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 45, Representative Position No. 2

Larry-Springer

Larry Springer, Democrat
Springer, the owner of a Kirkland wine shop, is the House Democratic caucus’ voice of reason on business issues. Though a member of House Democratic leadership, he shows strong independence, particularly on education reform ideas that cut against the powerful state teachers union. Springer’s deliberative, welcoming style should be a model of legislative demeanor.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Legislative District No. 46, State Senator and Representative Position No. 2

Endorsements to come

Legislative District No. 47, State Senator and Representative Position Nos. 1 and 2

Endorsements to come

Legislative District No. 48, State Senator and Representative Position Nos. 1 and 2

Endorsements to come

State Supreme Court races:

Justice Position No. 1

Endorsement to come

Justice Position No. 3

Endorsement to come

Justice Position No. 4

Endorsement to come

Justice Position No. 7

Endorsement to come

Congressional races:

United States Representative Congressional District No. 1

suzan-delbene

Suzan DelBene, Democrat
U.S. Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Medina, spent her first term in Congress operating at a level beyond her rookie status. She deserves re-election to continue her work on behalf of the 1st District.

Read editorial endorsement –>

United States Representative Congressional District No. 2

Rick Larsen, Democrat
Voters in the 2nd District have only one credible choice, U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Everett. He has worked hard on legislation that loops back to support jobs in his district and the state.

Read editorial endorsement –>

United States Representative Congressional District No. 6

Derek Kilmer, Democrat
Kilmer has made a promising start, securing $120 million in new investment for Naval Base Kitsap and working to support national defense and veterans’ programs. Kilmer’s most serious challenger is Republican real-estate broker Marty McClendon. McClendon says he is running because he supports limited government. He does not appear to have a grasp of congressional issues.

Read editorial endorsement –>

jim-mcdermott
United States Representative Congressional District No. 7

Jim McDermott, Democrat
Twenty-six years in office is a long time, but U.S. Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Seattle, grasps issues important to the 7th Congressional District better than his four fringe challengers. Seattle voters would probably benefit from a fresh perspective in Washington, D.C., but with no viable challengers in this race, they ought to stick with McDermott.

Read editorial endorsement –>

dave-reichert
United States Representative Congressional District No. 8

Dave Reichert, Republican
U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Auburn, has consistently rated among the most moderate members of Congress. But voters should keep an eye on his willingness to remain independent. During the 2013 government shutdown, he lacked a strong voice calling out the House GOP’s disastrous tactic of tying a budget vote to repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Read editorial endorsement –>

United States Representative Congressional District No. 9

Adam Smith, Democrat
Adam Smith is a nuanced thinker and ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee, which makes him a key advocate for this region’s military interests and an influential voice on U.S. involvement in armed conflicts abroad. Smith’s primary opponents, Democrat Don Rivers and independent Mark Greene, are perennial candidates. Republican challenger Doug Basler works in marketing, but has hardly waged a campaign.

Read editorial endorsement –>

denny-heck
United States Representative Congressional District No. 10

Denny Heck, Democrat
Heck has displayed the same hardworking competence he did as former Gov. Booth Gardner’s chief of staff, demonstrating more interest in policy than partisanship. He was this state’s lead on the marijuana-banking issue, helping convince federal regulators to ease banking restrictions. Last year, he won a bill reforming the reverse-mortgage market. Heck is leading the House fight to reauthorize the federal Export-Import Bank, critical to Washington exports.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Snohomish County:

Snohomish County Executive
John-Lovick

John Lovick, Democrat
John Lovick’s endorsements and his campaign treasury point to strong support for his re-election. Snohomish County has budget stress from a natural disaster, and persistent management issues with the county jail. Lovick has the experience, leadership and temperament to lead Snohomish County government.

Read editorial endorsement –>
Ty-Trenary
Snohomish County Sheriff

Ty Trenary
Trenary should be retained with the same enthusiasm that won him the appointment in July 2013. He was the unanimous choice of the Snohomish County Council to replace John Lovick, who resigned to be county executive. Trenary has 23 years in the sheriff’s office, and his range of service and leadership roles are reflected in a smooth transition. His department draws praise for its tireless performance after the Oso landslide this past spring.

Read editorial endorsement –>

Comments | Topics: election, November 2014 general election, Seattle Times editorial board

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