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Pac-12 Confidential

Bud Withers offers an inside look at the Pac-12 Conference and the national college scene.

October 25, 2011 at 1:53 PM

NCAA graduation rates: Mostly solid marks for area programs

The NCAA today released its annual Graduation Success Rate figures – that’s the companion research to the Academic Performance Rate numbers that can result in scholarship or post-season penalties – and it appears that the news was relatively positive for most programs in the area.

You can find the numbers at www.ncaa.org. Statistics include federal graduation rate numbers, the old rates the NCAA decided to refine several years ago because they docked schools for transfers out, even if they were in good academic standing.

In football, Washington had a solid 76 GSR and 69 in the federal reckoning, each of which ranked second in the Pac-12 behind Stanford 87 and 84.

Washington State’s football GSR of 62 and federal rate of 61 was the exact same as Utah, tying the Cougars for fifth in the league on the GSR and third in the federal grade.

For Football Bowl Subdivision programs, the average GSR over the four-year class (2001-04) was 67 percent.

Meanwhile, the men’s basketball numbers – always volatile because of ever-changing rosters and the academic implications – yielded mixed results. Washington had a 56 GSR (again, in the four-year 2001-04 entering-class cohort), tying the Huskies for seventh in the Pac-12 with Arizona State. The UW’s federal rate was 57.

Washington State’s men’s hoops GSR was 70, good for fourth in the league. Elsewhere, some schools didn’t exactly shine in men’s basketball; Arizona had a GSR of 43, USC 38 and Cal 33. The national four-year average was 66.

Gonzaga’s men basketball program had a 73 GSR and a 56 in the federal tally.

Other numbers: Washington women’s basketball had a 93 GSR, Washington State’s women 86, and the Gonzaga women 94.

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