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Politics Northwest

The Seattle Times political team explores national, state and local politics.

February 12, 2013 at 12:34 PM

Burgess, Staadecker lead January fundraising

City Councilmember Tim Burgess raised the most money among Seattle mayoral candidates in January, bringing in about $32,000, for a total of $133,000 since he declared in late November. Charlie Staadecker, a real estate broker and arts patron, raised $23,000 to bring his total to $94,000.

Mayor Mike McGinn brought in about $16,000 for January, for a total of about $120,000. State senator Ed Murray raised just $578 in January because of the restrictions on fundraising during the legislative session. But back in December when he could raise money, Murray trounced all the candidates by collecting more than $124,000, including donations from groups not usually associated with city elections — the Washington Hospital Political Action Committee, The Washington State Dental PAC and the Washington Health Care Association PAC.

Murray also had to return $6,500 to his senate campaign account because of rules that govern how that money can be moved around. His campaign spokesman, Sandeep Kaushik, said Murray will likely move the money back to his mayoral campaign after the fundraising freeze has ended.

Peter Steinbrueck raised almost $14,000 in January to bring his total to almost $18,000. Bruce Harrell, who didn’t enter the race until mid-January, reported almost $11,000 in contributions, but has a debt of about $23,000. Harrell has hired Argo Strategies as campaign consultant. The same group ran Joe Mallahan’s race against McGinn in 2009.

Greenwood activist Kate Martin hadn’t yet filed her January disclosure reports, but for December declared a total of $133.

Comments | More in Politics Northwest | Topics: fundraising, seattle mayor's race

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