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Politics Northwest

The Seattle Times political team explores national, state and local politics.

June 27, 2013 at 4:10 PM

Patty Murray’s Senate photo album: women and more women

WASHINGTON — The suits are as conservative as ever, but a lot more women are in ‘em.

A pair of portraits featured in Sen. Patty Murray’s first Instagram photo Thursday captures the remarkable rise of women in Congress. The first image, taken in 1993, shows five of the then-record six women serving in the Senate.

Murray, a Washington Democrat, swept into office that year along with Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer of California and Carol Mosely Braun of Illinois — tripling the Senate’s female population. California became the first state to have two female senators.

Today, the Senate includes 20 women. Four of them are new members who Murray helped to elect in 2012 as chairwoman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. Three states — Washington, California and New Hampshire — have all-female Senate delegations.

The 113th Congress also has a record 81 women in the House.

Top photo in 1993 shows five of then-record six women senators: (L to R) Patty Murray, Carol Mosely Braun of Illinois, Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer of California. Not pictured is Nancy Kassebaum of Kansas. Bottom photo shows 19 of a record 20 females in the current Congress. Freshman Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota is not pictured.

Top photo in 1993 shows five of then-record six women senators: (L to R) Patty Murray, Carol Mosely Braun of Illinois, Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer of California. Not pictured is Nancy Kassebaum of Kansas.
Bottom photo shows 19 of a record 20 women in the current Congress. Murray is fifth from left in front row; Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington is fifth from left in back row. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota is not pictured.

0 Comments | More in Congress, Politics Northwest, U.S. Senate | Topics: Maria Canwell, patty murray, women

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