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December 11, 2013 at 1:56 PM

Ed Murray names deputies, other high-profile hires

Seattle Mayor-elect Ed Murray on Wednesday named two deputy mayors and two administrators as part of his growing leadership team.

Seattle Mayor-elect Ed Murray on Wednesday named two deputy mayors and two administrators as part of his growing leadership team.  From the left are deputy mayors Andrea Riniker and Hyeok Kim, Steve Lee of the Office of Policy and Innovation, Jared Smith, waterfront and seawall project director, and Tina Podlodowski, who will lead the city’s police reform efforts. (Greg Gilbert/The Seattle Times)

Seattle Mayor-elect Ed Murray today named more members of his leadership team, including two deputy mayors and two administrators to oversee the city’s work on police reform and waterfront development.

Murray said he was hiring people with skills in collaboration and innovation.

“These are highly capable individuals who are ready to bring their energy, experience and expertise with them on day one of my administration,” Murray said.

The mayor-elect also said he would announce his process for searching for a new police chief soon after he takes office Jan. 1.

“I don’t have the keys to the place yet,” Murray joked, but said that with Mayor Mike McGinn’s 20/20 plan for police reform expiring in November, he would develop new strategies for implementing the changes in the force mandated by the U.S. Department of Justice. One of the new appointments announced today was former Seattle City Councilwoman Tina Podlodowski, a former chair of the Council’s Public Safety Committee and a member of the Community Police Commission, to lead the city’s police reform efforts.

Murray named Hyeok Kim as his deputy mayor for external affairs. Kim is currently executive director of Interim Community Development Association in the Chinatown/International District. Kim will serve as Murray’s chief liaison with Seattle communities and the region. Andrea Riniker, a former Bellevue City Manager, was lured out of retirement to serve as an interim deputy mayor for internal affairs. Riniker will focus on managing city departments with a goal of breaking down silos in government, as well as help Murray find a replacement for her.

Murray said he was bringing the city budget director position back into the mayor’s office, “to reflect the nature of the budget and the importance of the budget director role.” He named Ben Noble, current director of the City Council central staff, to the position.

In what he called a “real coup,” Murray named Robert Feldstein, the current chief of staff for New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Office of Policy and Strategic Planning, as his director for the newly created Office of Policy and Innovation. He said the office will function as an in-house consultant and expects staff members to be able to work on a variety of policy issues.

Murray also created a new position to oversee the city’s waterfront and seawall construction projects. Jared Smith, head of Northwest operations for Parsons Brinckerhoff, an engineering and construction management firm currently building the $290 million seawall, will serve as project director for that work.

The mayor-elect said he would launch a national search for a new director for the Seattle Department of Transportation. Murray fired current director Peter Hahn last month. Hahn’s deputy, Goran Sparrman, will serve as interim SDOT director.

Murray also named Steve Lee, an Oregon native, to be his Organzational Effectiveness lead in the new Office of Policy and Innovation. Lee has held positions at the White House, the National Association of Counties, the Oregon Legislature and the national Institute for Dispute Resolution.

0 Comments | More in Local government, Politics Northwest | Topics: ed murray, Seattle mayor-elect Ed Murray

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