403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
Follow us:
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx

Popcorn & Prejudice: A Movie Blog

Seattle Times writer Moira Macdonald muses on moviegoing. Email Moira: mmacdonald@seattletimes.com.

February 4, 2010 at 11:10 AM

An “E.T.” flashback — and, ice cream with “Up”

Last night I watched “Dear John,” an earnest but tolerable weepie with Amanda Seyfried and Channing Tatum. I wrote it up this morning, for tomorrow’s publication — sometimes you’re glad to write up a review right away, because you know that the movie will dissolve into thin air within a couple of days, leaving behind only a few nagging impressions. I’ve been particularly pondering a hospital scene that takes place in a hallway with a character on a stretcher. Why is he in the hallway? For the sole reason that it’s a more wistful composition of the shot if the patient is in a busy hallway and not in his room, even though there’s absolutely no reason why he should be out in the hallway and not in his room (he has one). When another character actually says to some medical person, “Hey, why is he out in the hall?” he is ignored, simply because the only answer the medical person could give is “Because the shot looks better that way,” and that would break the third wall of the movie and be kind of amazing, but it wouldn’t happen.
Anyway. In this movie is a supporting character, about whom I won’t elaborate because you really don’t want to get me started, played by an nice-looking actor named Henry Thomas, a name that rung a bell — because he was young Elliott in “E.T.” back in 1982. I remember seeing him popping up over the years — he was in Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York” back in 2002 — and noted in “Dear John” that he’s become a fine actor who’s now (get ready to feel old) in his late 30s. Every now and then, I see some former kid star turning up in a movie in middle age, and it’s startling. Movies seem like they make time stand still — there’s “E.T.” on DVD, forever young — and yet, on it goes.
Speaking of movies that make time stand still, I was so happy to see “Up” in the Oscar top ten, though I know it doesn’t stand a chance of taking home Best Picture. (Best Animated Feature, yes.) That wordless sequence, early in the movie, about the couple’s life together is perhaps my favorite five minutes of cinema in 2009; so poignant, so artful, so honest, so quietly joyful and, at its end, so devastatingly sad. And here’s a nice little “Up” item I found today in New York Magazine: Did you know that the ice cream parlor at the end, Fentons, is a real place? It’s in Oakland, a mom-and-pop type hangout near the Pixar headquarters, and now people show up regularly to have their picture taken having a cone in front of it, just like Carl and Russell and Dug the dog. Sweet, in several ways.

Comments

COMMENTS

No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ.



The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.


403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx
403 Forbidden

403 Forbidden


nginx