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Popcorn & Prejudice: A Movie Blog

Seattle Times writer Moira Macdonald muses on moviegoing. Email Moira: mmacdonald@seattletimes.com.

October 27, 2011 at 10:19 AM

Scary movies on the horizon

Weirdly, there are no true horror movies opening (though “Marcy Marcy May Marlene” is certainly a thriller — and a fine one — and there’s plenty that’s scary, however unintentionally, in “Anonymous”) this Halloween weekend, and not too many in the coming weeks. (Watch, though, for Almodovar’s “The Skin I LIve In” coming soon — very, very creepy.) But the next six months bring all kinds of horror, some of which sounds pretty promising; here are a few possible highlights, for those who like to shiver.
— “The Woman in Black.” Daniel Radcliffe’s first post-“Harry Potter” project is a moody Victorian-era ghost story, based on a novel by Susan Hill (also transformed into a long-running London play, which I saw years ago and which scared the shoes off me). The always excellent Janet McTeer and Ciaran Hinds co-star, and the trailer (which I’ve posted before) is suitably eerie. Opening Feb. 3.
— “The Raven.” For all those Poe fanatics who also like John Cusack, this movie is a fictionalized account of the great crime writer’s last days. James McTeigue (“V for Vendetta”) directs. Opening March 9.
— “The Amityville Horror: The Lost Tapes.” For those eager to squeeze just a few more scares out of the movies’ most famous haunted house. Opening Jan. 27.
— “The House at the End of the Street.” Academy Award nominee Jennifer Lawrence (“Winter’s Bone”) stars in this tale of a young woman who befriends the survivor of a next-door murder. Opening April 20.
— “Dark Shadows.” Tim Burton’s re-imagining of the 1960s horror/soap opera, with Johnny Depp as vampire Barnabas Collins and co-starring Eva Green (who looks like she could play a vampire like nobody’s business), Michelle Pfeiffer, Helena Bonham Carter and Christopher Lee. Opening May 11.
— “The Awakening.” This ghost story, set in 1921 England, played the Toronto Film Festival earlier this fall; it doesn’t yet have a U.S. release date, but I’m hoping we’ll be seeing it soon — it seems very much in the “Turn of the Screw”/”The Others”/”Orphanage” school of elegant scares. Very much my cup of tea, so to speak, and Rebecca Hall is always a joy to watch. Here’s a clip, to whet your appetite.

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