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Popcorn & Prejudice: A Movie Blog

Seattle Times writer Moira Macdonald muses on moviegoing. Email Moira: mmacdonald@seattletimes.com.

December 5, 2012 at 10:02 AM

Wandering onstage with Bill Murray

Bill Murray as FDR in “Hyde Park on Hudson” arrives in Seattle theaters next week, and while it’s a fine performance, I’m not sure if it’ll be much in play for awards consideration. (Daniel Day-Lewis, as Lincoln, seems to be stealing all the thunder; with Joaquin Phoenix in “The Master” and Denzel Washington in “Flight” a distant second.) But it’s always a treat to spend a little time with Murray, whether onscreen (“Rushmore” is my favorite) or off. Should you have a few minutes to read this morning, check out this New York Times profile of Murray, in which a private in-person interview led to a chat onstage before an audience of hundreds. (Writer Dave Itzkoff: “Imagine accompanying Mr. Murray on a version of the famous tracking shot from “Goodfellas,” through the back rooms and bowels of an unfamiliar building until the moment you expect to part ways and take your seat in the audience, only to realize then that you’re part of the act.”) My favorite detail: Murray, in a hotel room wearing “a plaid shirt and blue shorts” is told by a publicist that he needs to change for his public appearance; he changes the shirt, but not the shorts.
The whole story’s here. It’s fun. Particularly this anecdote, which has nothing to do with movies, but does say something about seeing:

I spoke about the first time I went to Wrigley Field in Chicago, and I was a big Cubs fan, and I watched all the games on TV, but when I grew up, TV was in black and white. So when I was 7 years old, I was taken to my first Cubs games, and my brother Brian said, “Wait, Billy,” and he put his hands over my eyes, and he walked me up the stairs. And then he took his hands away. [He begins to get choked up.] And there was Wrigley Field, in green. There was this beautiful grass and this beautiful ivy. I’d only seen it in black and white. It was like I was a blind man made to see. It was something.

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